Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 93253 times)

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #550 on: April 07, 2021, 07:45:24 PM »

It would appear this Valencia pride seedling is flowering. It is 2 years old.

You're correct. Usually my seedlings flower at 3 years old. Yours looks skinny; Why not plant it on ground?

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #551 on: April 07, 2021, 07:48:14 PM »
can someone help me to buy scions of "cat hoa loc"?, please?

A member here name Squam (Alex) has many different scions to choose. But we don't know it's true Cat Hoa Loc or not. I wish someone visits VN and gets some true scions back.

K-Rimes

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #552 on: April 07, 2021, 09:58:08 PM »

It would appear this Valencia pride seedling is flowering. It is 2 years old.

You're correct. Usually my seedlings flower at 3 years old. Yours looks skinny; Why not plant it on ground?

I'm in 9b and it's pretty cold up here. I don't have any soil to put it that stands out as a microclimate. I am tempted to risk it but... It's so near and dear, babying it along as I have. Hit 24f last year and 26f this year.

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #553 on: April 07, 2021, 10:02:39 PM »

It would appear this Valencia pride seedling is flowering. It is 2 years old.

You're correct. Usually my seedlings flower at 3 years old. Yours looks skinny; Why not plant it on ground?

I'm in 9b and it's pretty cold up here. I don't have any soil to put it that stands out as a microclimate. I am tempted to risk it but... It's so near and dear, babying it along as I have. Hit 24f last year and 26f this year.

24 or 26F is deadly. If you really want to eat fruits, I think you should have it in very big container -- deep is more important than diameter I think. I know once my seedlings are in ground and they grew much faster after 2 or 3 yrs.

Lovetoplant

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #554 on: April 08, 2021, 03:02:45 PM »
I believe Simon is correct about Sapdodilla trees. I have included (4) photos for comparison. I purchased a number of Sapodilla Trees in 2017 including an Alano and Molix. You can see for yourself the difference in growth between June of 2017 and Nov of 2019 in my Alano. I have since sold my Alano since I successfully grafted three scions from this tree onto my Tikal sapodilla which was already in the ground.

My Molix sapodilla tree has grown quite well in the three years I have had it. You can see the photo from 2017 and another one was just taken recently.

Johnny



Alano Sapodilla 6-3-2017


Alano Sapodilla Tree 11-15-2019


Molix Sapodilla Tree 6-3-2017


Molix Sapodilla Tree11-18-2020

Johny, where did you buy Sapodillas from?

LuvFig

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #555 on: April 09, 2021, 04:34:32 PM »
Greetings!

I am new to this forum.  Great info!  Has anyone grown Philippines Carabao mango in SoSCal or in Los Angeles?  How does it compare to Lemon Zest, Sweet Tart and Nam Doc Mai? 

It seems Ong Nursery in San Diego may have it but they don't opened until the weekend.  Trying to find out if this Carabao from Ong's is the same that is grown on the island of Guimaras that are supposedly very sweet.  Is it grafted or on its rootstock, and does it grow well in SoCal with clay soil etc.

Thanks in advance!
Grace

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #556 on: May 02, 2021, 09:55:18 PM »
Does bagging mangos in a paper bag help the fruit develop quicker?



Pictured here is a honeykiss panicle i bagged and the mangos on it are significantly bigger than unbagged panicles that are from the same tree and variety and within  inches of each other.

The bagged panicles also have larger mangos on a parson graft on the same tree. The unbagged panicles have smaller mangoes.

Is this an established phenomenon?

Also on parson the panicles are really short compared to the other varieties is this normal? Note that it seems to want to hold alot of fruit.



Final question does anyone know of parson is mono or poly?

Thanks.

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #557 on: May 03, 2021, 02:42:44 AM »
I would thin that one out, otherwise the fruit will cluster like peaches, and there will be issues where the edges touch.

I've theorized that the best way to accelerate fruit development on mango would be to use paper/ waxpaper bags to encapsulate the fruit. Thank you for the data point.

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #558 on: May 03, 2021, 07:46:51 AM »
I would thin that one out, otherwise the fruit will cluster like peaches, and there will be issues where the edges touch.

I've theorized that the best way to accelerate fruit development on mango would be to use paper/ waxpaper bags to encapsulate the fruit. Thank you for the data point.

Thanks for the reply.

I periodically open the bags and see if any are still dropping. I eventually want to end up with one fruit on each parson panicle but i am unsure that if i thin the one which the tree was going to hold im going to lose all of the fruit.

Anyone know if parson panicles are usually this short and if parson is mono or poly?

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #559 on: May 03, 2021, 09:21:59 AM »
Hello Simon,

Thank-you for the information.  The NDM seedlings are all pushing new growth.  My NDM tree appears to be a dwarf/semi-dwarf tree - almost as wide as tall (10ft.)  It's been in the ground for 6 years and has produced well.  Just to confirm, anything grafted to a dwarf/semi-dwarf rootstock will be a slow grower or small tree (under 12 feet).  Does Pina Colada do well in So. Cal?  I was looking to graft the Pina Colada onto the NDM tree this year.

Tony

Hey Tony, I donít have enough data on Pina Colada yet but it tastes absolutely amazing! It is a slow grower so I wouldnít recommend it on Florida rootstock and I also wouldnít recommend grafting it onto a slow growing tree.

I have a seedling selection of Pina Colada that I grafted onto my big(relatively) Florida rootstock and this works for me because the rootstock is well established and Iím grafting seedling scions so the grafted branch  should grow vegetatively for at least a year or two before flowering.

Some others in California have reported poor growth and disease/production issues with this variety but I was so impressed with the flavor that I planted out about 50 seeds/seedlings and Iím hoping I get lucky with a more vigorous, disease resistant and productive seedling selection.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #560 on: May 03, 2021, 09:29:49 AM »
Greetings!

I am new to this forum.  Great info!  Has anyone grown Philippines Carabao mango in SoSCal or in Los Angeles?  How does it compare to Lemon Zest, Sweet Tart and Nam Doc Mai? 

It seems Ong Nursery in San Diego may have it but they don't opened until the weekend.  Trying to find out if this Carabao from Ong's is the same that is grown on the island of Guimaras that are supposedly very sweet.  Is it grafted or on its rootstock, and does it grow well in SoCal with clay soil etc.

Thanks in advance!
Grace

Hello Grace,

Someone grew Carabao, I donít know if itís the Sweet Elena that was reported to be the sweetest mango in the world but the newer Zill varieties tasted significantly better and sweeter than the Carabao we sampled at our mango tasting. Lemon Zest, Orange Sherbet and the non Zill Po Pyu Kalay that Maurice Kong introduced were orders of magnitude better.

The Manilla/Carabao trees at Ongs nursery made good rootstocks from what people have been reporting to me but I donít have any in my yard.

If you have disease issues or if you donít know if you have disease issues, Sweet Tart is one of the sweetest and best tasting mangos.

Simon

Simon

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #561 on: May 08, 2021, 02:53:09 AM »
This mango tree decided its time to set way too many fruit.  Its annoying because I had to spend a lot of time thinning it out.  Last year it did it a little and the fruit that weren't thinned stuck on the tree and were tiny.  They don't self thin like a an avocado.  Its like a peach that Ollie mentioned. 






Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #562 on: May 08, 2021, 03:09:52 AM »
Damn, theyíre looking great now. Iím surprised that tree isnít self thinning in stages. Is that the SweetTart seedling? My SweetTart seedling sets tons of fruit as well but it eventually self thins and drops most the mangos except 1-3 per panicle, usually just one.

I need to stop over again and check out the trees.

Simon

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #563 on: May 10, 2021, 03:43:51 PM »
These pics were taken yesterday.

Honeykiss not bagged

Honeykiss bagged


Parson bagged

Parson unbagged




simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #564 on: May 10, 2021, 04:36:23 PM »
Nice Goya626,

Honey kiss is a very productive variety in SoCal but it can be so productive that it doesnít grow much if you let it hold too much fruit. Please keep us updated!

Simon

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #565 on: May 10, 2021, 07:46:34 PM »
Nice Goya626,

Honey kiss is a very productive variety in SoCal but it can be so productive that it doesnít grow much if you let it hold too much fruit. Please keep us updated!

Simon

The honeykiss graft is on a potted tree, i dont expect it to grow much. Im hoping it keeps fruit so i can start seeds since according to my research honeykiss is polyembryonic.

John B

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #566 on: May 10, 2021, 11:56:20 PM »
It was time to start cutting back this triple trunk Atulfo tree. I let it fruit 3 fruit last year. One was actually good but long term, it was not the end result.

It was a bit over 9 ft tall but fruit were weighing most branches down. Started to develop PM but I didn't care to spray. Got sweet tart and peach cobbler Scions from TAF. Those Scions were bulging! They were shipped last Monday but today was first day I could spend time grafting. They've been chilling in the fridge.

Cleft, veneer, and that "coffin" graft were attempted. I'll see what the end result is and then decide how to shape depending on if anything takes.









« Last Edit: May 11, 2021, 01:26:57 PM by John B »

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #567 on: May 11, 2021, 11:52:08 AM »
Nice John,

Peach Cobbler is a great variety. I would also recommend Sweet Tart. Did you try separating the three seedlings when they were smaller? Good luck with the grafts!

Simon

John B

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #568 on: May 11, 2021, 01:25:54 PM »
Nice John,

Peach Cobbler is a great variety. I would also recommend Sweet Tart. Did you try separating the three seedlings when they were smaller? Good luck with the grafts!

Simon

Simon, darn autocorrect! I updated the post to say sweet tart. I have 7 sweet tart grafts and 3 peach cobbler on it. Hoping at least one of each make it!

I bought this from Clausen nursery a couple years ago when they had them in stock. They were grown from seed and the polyembryonic seeds were never separated. I didn't know about mangos back then (still learning, too) and per their recommendation I kept the three going. After learning more, it appeared I should have cut it down to one but never did. I believe you recommended I do that as well.

Well, they started growing like a weed on this hill, so I figured I'd let nature take it's course and decide what to do once I can get successful grafts onto it. Time will tell. The bottoms do appear to be fusing together, which I don't know if it would ever become a single trunk.

dyb5150

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #569 on: May 18, 2021, 12:23:30 AM »
This thread is great. Need some help with my young mangoes. Recently purchased the following from FL on turpentine repotted in gritty mix 1.5 months ago (in the pic from leftish to right):

Maha Chanok (26Ē)
Lemon Zest (24Ē)
Sweet Tart (18Ē)
Coconut Cream (19Ē)

All but ST seem to be flowering at the top of the main stem. Before the flowering, my plan was to let these grow to 2-3í then cut the trunk just below the ring to encourage 3-4 scaffolds nicely spaced. But, now iím not sure what to do with the panicle. Night time temps are 50-55* and rising. Do i go ahead and let them flower and remove pea sized fruitlets...then cut panicle? Or, cut all or a portion of the panicles now? When i do, cut it at the panicle base but above the ring of green leaves? Will the trunk continue to grow straight up from the cut? I have lots of fruit trees but these are my first mangoes and would like to take the best approach for health of the plant.

Second matter, i understand the turpentine rootstock issue. Iím in zone 10b/21...very sandy, rocky soil that i amend lightly. 10+ hours of daily summer sun with reflective heat from the ground. Hoping conditions are such that these thrive...even on the turpentine. I understand the ST and LZ are vigorous...what about MC and CC?

Lastly, my plan was to leave in the pots until perhaps next Spring...then move to the ground. My biggest fear are the Santa Ana winds (50-60mph at my location). Is that a decent strategy or would you get them in the ground sooner (ie this growing season and stake the hell outta them)?

Iíve read the entire thread and searched around and i couldnít find the same issues. Any help would be very much appreciated.

Bonus topic - i have makok and alano sapodillas...trying to find a silas woods...what are my best bets here in SoCal?

Sincerest thanks!

db


« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 01:11:24 AM by dyb5150 »

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #570 on: May 18, 2021, 07:58:59 AM »
Hey dB,

Your conditions seem really good for growing Florida Turpentine rootstock trees. They seem to like areas with more heat units and they also prefer good draining soils. Another bonus is that your trees are younger and less likely to be root bound.

You can remove half the bloom panicle now just to relief some of the weight. This will help prevent bending of the branches which can expose the bark to sunburn. Leave the remaining panicle until average low temps are around 62F which is probably in about another 2-4 weeks at my location but depends on your specific micro climate. Remember that itís not the lowest temperatures at night that you are looking for but approximate average low temps.

If other mango trees in your area are pushing vegetative growth, that is a good time to remove all of the blooms or small fruit.

When you do make your cut, cut below the dense ring or leaves. You want to have 3-4 evenly spaced leaves or petiole scars below your cut.

With your conditions you described, your Florida trees should thrive. Maha may not grow as fast as the others and Coconut Cream will probably be very droopy but they should be fine if you prune off the droopy branches.

If I were you, I would plant the trees into the ground now. We are about to hit the mango vegetative growing season and the roots will be able to grow a lot if you get them into the ground now. Dig a square hole and backfill with native soil. Most people make the mistake of over amending their backfill hole with too much organic matter and thatís just one of the reasons the trees do poorly. Your native soil is your best bet.

Simon

dyb5150

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #571 on: May 18, 2021, 06:13:50 PM »
Hey Simon, appreciate your helpful suggestions. I do want to clarify just to make sure I understand where to make the cut when ready. Apologies if this is too basic...but I've edited my photo. I understand (or it seems to me) the whole growth above the highest ring of green leaves are the "bloom panicles." Not sure if this is entirely correct...as they are a bit different on the Maha (furthest in the pic) and LZ (second furthest)...than the Coconut Cream (nearest). On the CC, seems everything above the ring of green leaves is the bloom panicle and stem is red/burgundy...so, I supposed I would cut at the red oval. But, what about the Maha and LZ...is everything above the highest ring of green leaves the "bloom panicle?" I see shoots (circled in light blue) that perhaps may be trunk or scaffold branches developing...they have both small green leaves growing...as well as little flower clusters developing. Just want to make sure if I should cut at the red ovals approximately...or if that would actually be heading the trunk and a mistake?

Lastly, if everything above the ring of green leaves are the bloom panicles...and I'll eventually be making the heading cut just below the highest ring of green leaves (ie just below the panicles)...then there will only be approximately 10" of main trunk above the grafts. So, seems the scaffold branches will be extremely close to the grafts...unless the trunk continues to develop between the graft and the first scaffold branch. I just don't understand how the trees that developed flowers at the top of the main trunk...thus eliminating any possibility for them to grow their main trunk taller.

Again, apologies if this is too basic...just trying to understand and get a picture in my mind as to how the trees are going to respond once I make the cuts.

Thanks again,

db

« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 06:19:04 PM by dyb5150 »

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #572 on: May 19, 2021, 11:32:10 AM »
Hello db,

For the tree that is the closest, your CC, you would cut below the red circle. There are still bloom spikes below your red circle. Immediately below your bloom panicles is a dense whorl of leaves that is tightly spaced together. Beneath this dense clusters of leaves is usually several more distantly spaced leaves.

In your case it looks like you have another dense cluster of leaves beneath your upper most leaf whorl or intercalation. Maybe itís just the picture but I canít tell you where to cut unless you space out the trees and take a closer up picture so that I can see the leaf spacing.

You can pm me and we can do FaceTime and that might be easier but I wonít have time till tomorrow. I have a big project at work today.

Simon

Mango Stein

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #573 on: May 19, 2021, 12:14:06 PM »
I have a Coconut Cream SEEDLING tree planted in-ground in climate akin to Socal. Just wondering to what size I can maintain an adult tree and whether this is done with a cincturing tool.
I would not recommend people deal with Fruit Lovers

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #574 on: May 19, 2021, 02:28:52 PM »
Seedling trees can get huge in warmer climates but I have no idea about your soil make up, pH, drainage and soil nutrients. Also, seedling trees may be Zygotic so may grow different than a clone. Sorry I canít be of more help.

Simon