Author Topic: Beneficial Insects  (Read 257 times)

Millet

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Beneficial Insects
« on: May 18, 2021, 04:50:05 PM »
Beneficial insects were a lot more visible prior to the discovery of citrus greening disease than they are today, due to spraying. Research studies found that beneficial insects knocked down 80% to 90% of the Asian citrus psyllid population.

Yorgos

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2021, 02:47:46 PM »
How many psyllids does it take to infect a tree with HLB?  One bite from 1 psyllid? Or does it take numerous psyllids to infect a tree?
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

Millet

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2021, 06:19:38 PM »
Yprgos,  I don't know the answer to your question.  I want to say that I am not against spraying.  I have never seen any information published concerning the tree damage from HLB between organic growers, and conventional growers.  It would be interesting. 

lebmung

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2021, 06:31:50 AM »
It could be a reason, overuse of pesticides. Aslo areas with hot summers have less of a problem.
Quote
higher temperatures of 104 F and 114 F, the survival rates decrease by 95 percent and 100 percent

Probably that's why Mediterranean countries are not so infected like Florida. Dry summers with 105 during the day kills the Psyllid.

 

CarolinaZone

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2021, 09:14:58 AM »
How many psyllids does it take to infect a tree with HLB?  One bite from 1 psyllid? Or does it take numerous psyllids to infect a tree?
Ok, so what are the beneficial insects? Are they available for purchase?

Millet

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2021, 11:31:53 AM »
Preserving Beneficial Insects
May 18, 2021Biologicals, HLB Management

beneficial insects
Green lacewing
Beneficial insects could be a citrus grower’s best friend. In a time when producers are applying insecticides to control the Asian citrus psyllid, the vector of citrus greening disease, it’s important to preserve the psyllids’ natural enemies, like lady beetles and lacewings.

Jawwad Qureshi, University of Florida entomologist, implores growers to scout their groves periodically to see what insects are present.

“If they know what’s there, then they can strategize their spraying. If they go out there and see a lot of lady beetles or a lot of lacewings, then they can think, maybe I should wait a little, or if I have to spray, maybe I should look into the Citrus Production Guide and see which pesticides are relatively less toxic so I can use one of those rather than using something that’s really harsh,” Qureshi says.

Qureshi is not suggesting growers stop spraying. But they need to evaluate the situation and see what insects are present. They need to conserve and preserve those resources.

“Let’s say you have a good population of lady beetles and you go and knock them down. That means you’ve killed many of those adults that were going to produce the eggs and babies that were going to be useful, not only for you, but for the neighbors and other crops as well,” he adds.

Beneficial insects were a lot more visible prior to the discovery of citrus greening disease than they are today. Qureshi said research studies found that beneficial insects knocked down 80% to 90% of the Asian citrus psyllid population.

“Several years ago, before this greening disease was found in Florida, we relied heavily on biologicals in the citrus system. There were a lot of lady beetles, lacewings and other beneficial predators that were feeding on the psyllid,” Qureshi says. He notes that sprays used for greening have significantly impacted the populations of beneficial insects.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2021, 11:35:15 AM by Millet »

CarolinaZone

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Re: Beneficial Insects
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2021, 04:23:37 PM »
Thanks.