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Messages - Sven

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1
 I cut one of the petioles and scraped some of the bark but no white latex. Itís hard to tell if the leaves are changing shape or if itís just slight variations at this point. Maybe itís something like an Oak leaved papaya and the juvenile leaves are not separated. The seeds were certainly at least three or four times the size of a regular papaya seed. Itíll be easier once they start blooming.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can anyone ID this legume from Vietnam?
« on: August 09, 2018, 03:56:16 PM »
Thank you I will check it out

If you are on Facebook...

There is a Vietnamese Exotic & Tropical Fruit Growers group that may be able to help you.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/430076437329439/

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can anyone ID this legume from Vietnam?
« on: August 09, 2018, 03:55:08 PM »
Ha. It does very much look like that.   The plant does look very papaya like.  I had to go back a ways but I have attached some pictures of the seed and they do look like extra large papaya seeds possibly. So I think youíre onto something. Perhaps just a weird papaya variety or a papaya relative.










4
 I was trying to buy some Yum berry fruit seeds from someone in Vietnam last year and they sent seeds for this plant instead.  The seeds looks like a dried pea except they were tan in color.   They germinated well and made it through the winter but they dropped all their leaves.    They were small plants so they may not be deciduous at maturity.  It may not even be an edible plant but if anyone has any idea what it might be Iíd appreciate it. Thank you








5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help on my dragon fruit
« on: October 18, 2017, 09:46:52 AM »
These are rainforest cacti so they actually like a lot of water.  Your damage looks like sunburn to me as well.  Not watering enough can significantly increase their susceptibility to sunburn.  If you have well draining soil you can and should water every day.  If you water too much the green parts of the stem below ground level will rot off and leave just the central core, but it still won't usually kill the plant.  It's really hard to overwater dragon fruit if you have good draining soil.  They are shallow rooted plants so they do better with smaller amounts of water more often.  I water mine every day.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Breeding/selecting with dioecious plants
« on: August 19, 2017, 10:17:58 AM »
With goats, when you are looking to buy a male (buck) you look at the genetics of his mother and her traits like production, conformation and so on.

The same would go for your trees. You can't do much in the first round but once you have identified your best female trees, take seeds from those trees and grow out some males and use those for breeding.

If space is a problem you can plant larger numbers of trees in hedge rows with closer spacing and in unused areas like along roads.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrceugenia growing experiences
« on: August 01, 2017, 09:24:15 PM »
It looks interesting, I've never heard of it.  I did a quick search and I could only find one source and they are out of stock. 

http://www.chileflora.com/Florachilena/FloraEnglish/ESeeds.htm?G_CAT=CT30&G_SRCH=petal

You can get plants of Myrceugenia ovata var. nannophylla here it looks like

http://www.desertnorthwest.com/catalog/page5.html

8
Just for comparison sake I found at my place that Luc's Garcinia can't take as much cold as Garcinia humilis.  I didn't bother covering the greenhouse with plastic this past winter and the leaves on Luc's Garcinia turned brown and eventually fell off while G. humilis did not loose any leaves.  The link below is to a picture of the plants.  They were side by side in the greenhouse which only had 30% shade cloth on it.  Both are 2 or 3 years old.  Both plants are still alive and have just this week put out new growth.


https://postimg.cc/image/ygfsuu3xh/

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Arizona Purple dragonfruit
« on: July 23, 2017, 07:49:31 PM »
I believe they are all the same variety, Paul Thomson's 8S.  Paul also had a 7S which was nearly identical to 8S and the parent of both called Haughton (sp?) is also very similar.  I think Arizona Purple is the same as 8S/Voodoo Child/Sugar dragon but if not it's probably 7S or Haughton. 

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia ID
« on: June 25, 2017, 07:56:59 PM »
I'm not an expert but it looks like my pintangatuba..

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: soil analysis
« on: June 18, 2017, 06:50:13 PM »
Clay can bind and hold a lot more minerals than your typical potting soil so your results sound reasonable. We always send out samples so I don't have any experience with the home kits but I have heard they are not very accurate. If you are looking for a soil lab we always use Kinsey Ag and have been very happy with them.

http://www.kinseyag.com/index.html

12
I've always used the following peat pellets for planting small seeds:

https://www.amazon.com/Jiffy-Pellets-Starting-Starter-Seedlings/dp/B000E435YA

I just did a quick search and found that site at random so there are probably cheaper ones. 

They work great for anything with tiny seeds.

13
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Looking for mulberry cuttings
« on: January 26, 2014, 11:58:32 PM »
I have Pakistan and Persian.  I need to send some to another forum member soon, so e-mail me if you are interested in either of these.

14
E-mail sent.  Thanks.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Upcoming Arctic blast and Greenhouses
« on: January 05, 2014, 08:47:22 PM »
Nice job on the greenhouse Mark!

Iím not sure how much power those soil heaters will draw but I always thought it might be cheaper to use a gas water heater and run water lines through the soil with a small circulation pump.  It should be fairly easy to set up a thermostat/controller similar to water solar panel systems to control the flow through the system based on the temperature of the water coming back out of the soil.  You might have to use copper, which would get expensive, but maybe the thin wall class 200 PVC would transfer heat well enough.  Just another option.

Sven
Sven, thanks for the ideas on the heating. The thermostat will be no problem, I think I can run a hot water line to the greenhouse fairly easy.

I was thinking of using a separate water heater but if you can loop it back to your house water heater that would be much easier.  You just need a pump and the thermostat.  Maybe some of that new type of flexible water line they use in houses these days (Iíve seen it at Home Depot) would work instead of PVC.  Also, you might be able to use one of those long compost thermometers to take soil temperature readings.  Our basement temperature (which is partially or mostly dependent on the soil temp) goes from the low to mid 50s in the winter to about 70 in the summer so you may not have to heat the soil up as much as you might think.  5 or 10 degrees may do it.

16
Those fruits are beautiful Marcos, inside and out!  Your friends reaction is encouraging as well, I am glad they liked them.  I canít wait to get some growing and to try the fruit, it looks wonderful.  Thanks for sharing the pictures and your experiences.  When you eat the skin can you eat all of it or do the flower parts (sepals?) have to be removed or spit out?

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Upcoming Arctic blast and Greenhouses
« on: January 05, 2014, 09:11:25 AM »
Nice job on the greenhouse Mark!

Iím not sure how much power those soil heaters will draw but I always thought it might be cheaper to use a gas water heater and run water lines through the soil with a small circulation pump.  It should be fairly easy to set up a thermostat/controller similar to water solar panel systems to control the flow through the system based on the temperature of the water coming back out of the soil.  You might have to use copper, which would get expensive, but maybe the thin wall class 200 PVC would transfer heat well enough.  Just another option.

Sven

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A new annona variety from Brazil?
« on: December 29, 2013, 09:33:39 PM »
Great find Luis,

Now we just need some seeds.  Very cool species, thanks for posting.

Sven

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: we added 7 new native fruit species
« on: December 29, 2013, 09:07:25 PM »
Good work Marcos,

Where did you find the trees, a nursery?  They look good, I hope they do well and fruit for you quickly.  Are you going to put them in the ground soon or keep them in pots for a while? 

Sven

20
Hi Emegar,

This article has a lot of good tips:  http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/277/

It's good to let them dry out some between waterings.  Was the potting mix sterile?  Some molds won't hurt anything, but others will. 

"We follow the school of thought that seedlings and plants should be watered deeply when they begin to dry out, and then left until they begin to dry out again... If you are seeing mold, it is a sure sign of too much moisture for too long; mold will grow when there is a constant source of moisture"

Read more: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/833558/#ixzz2ouztesOd

Good luck, I'm hoping they come up.

Sven

21
Regarding the taste of "garlic" on these species former classified as "Hexaclamys spp." I have one that really tastes like garlic...  seeds arrived also on the same package and if fruited last year for the first time... it arrived labelled as Hexaclamys tomentosa, and now I believe Helton calls it Eugenia anomala... this one is pure "garlic"!... last year photos next:




The fruit shape and color is very similar to the ones of the Ubajai that fruited this year, but on this Hexaclamys tomentosa the leaves are much more slender and the tree habit is more "Bushy"... Is it possible that I have an hybrid between these two Hexaclamys spp. ???


Oscar,

Itís been about 12 years since I set eyes on the tree at the Fullerton arboretum, but if my memory isnít faulty the leaves are very similar to those pictured above of the Hexaclamys tomentosa/ Eugenia anomala, not the wider leaves in Miguelís other pictures.  Back then it never fruited much, in fact it only had one fruit on it the year I tried it and it was a fairly large tree.  The fruit I tried was very soft and probably over ripe but it definitely was not something I would go back for seconds of. 

Sven

22
I found this site the other day and thought some of you might find it useful:

https://www.plantant.com/find-plants#!name=eugenia&plant=1008004

Itís mostly nurseries in Florida and on the East Coast of the US but it might help some of you.  If you search for a plant it will tell you what nurseries have it and what sizes they have.

Cheers,
Sven


23
Hi Digpati,

What does the fruit of Ziziphus oenoplia taste like?  How do people use the fruit?  How much cold do you think the plant can survive?

Thanks,
Sven

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit Overload
« on: December 17, 2013, 11:43:47 AM »
Mike,

Do you have any idea if those star apples can take any more cold than the regular ones?  The leavesin your picture look a little more stout than the ones on the plants I used to grow from seed and kill from cold.

Thanks,
Sven

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