Author Topic: Is it dead?  (Read 976 times)

irun5k

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Is it dead?
« on: August 12, 2022, 03:53:55 PM »
I put this jackfruit in the ground in the spring but some recent changes in landscaping required me to relocate it last weekend.  I suspected it might struggle with the shock of the whole thing.

Should I just replace it or wait it out?  It is not dead yet but I do not know if it is dying all the way and just needs time to finish what it started or if it may come back?  It was healthy before this incident.

It is a MAI 1, grafted.  I will say I was surprised how little it had grown- I put a lychee, mango and sapodilla in at the same time nearby and they’ve all had multiple large growth flushes.




Jaboticaba45

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2022, 05:11:07 PM »
The branches are still green and it still has leaves. Why would you suspect it to be dead?
Since you transplanted it, it is going through shock.
To help it recover, you can make an artificial canopy to provide shade. Keep it well watered and it should be fine.
Just be careful of root rot. I know it can happen to jackfruit in wet soils.

irun5k

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2022, 02:44:33 PM »
Well, the defoliation seems to have stopped and it still does have a few leaves as you mentioned and the branches are green.  So, hopefully it will rebound.  If it starts putting out new leaves I will know for sure.... I will give it a while and see.

ScottR

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2022, 07:22:53 PM »
Alive until you scrape bark and it not green underneath bark any more.

irun5k

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2023, 12:40:08 PM »
So, it didn't die.  However, it doesn't seem to be growing very fast, for a fruit that I've heard is normally a fast grower.  The other trees I planted at the same time, including a lychee, mango and sapodilla have all experienced much more growth, although they were larger and this was a pretty small plant.  (I only mention the comparison to rule out any major environmental issues.)

Something is affecting the leaves- any ideas?  Wondering if I need to hit it with some fungicide.

My "backup" jackfruit is a J-31 that is still a pot- I bought it when I thought I had killed this MAI-1.  From a growth habit standpoint the J-31 looks like it is ready to take off.

Any opinions of whether I should dig up and replace the MAI-1 with this J-31?  Unfortunately I only have room for one.







« Last Edit: June 17, 2023, 12:42:30 PM by irun5k »

irun5k

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2023, 12:45:58 PM »
Closeup of the leaves- having issues getting all the pics into one post for some reason.




brian

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2023, 01:51:32 PM »
Both the in-ground one and the container jackfruit look like they need fertilizer. 

Hard to say if you'll get better results with waiting on the in-ground or replacing with the container one. 

Galatians522

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2023, 02:17:13 PM »
For what its worth. Grafted jacks grow about half as fasts as seedlings (unless you pull the multi-rootstock trick). Something in the grafting slows them down. This is not an issue for mango in Florida (apparently it is an issue in California?). And Lychee is almost always air layered. So, it is normal for a grafted jackfruit to grow slower than lychee and mango.

Galatians522

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2023, 02:26:10 PM »
What killed all your grass? Maybe that (drought, herbicide, etc.) is what is responsible for the burnt looking leaves on the Jackfruit. I have never heard of Jackfruit needing fungicide. I would be more inclined to attribute the issue to drought, sunburn, or some other kind of stress. Once again, grafted jacks tend to have a weaker root system (especially since the tap root rairly develops properly in a nursery pot) and would be more sensitive than mango or lychee. Mango, by the way is incredibly drought tollerent for a fruiting tree.

brian

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2023, 02:34:11 PM »
My grafted jackfruit (in-ground, in-greenhouse) is already very vigorous, I can't imagine wanting it grow faster.

irun5k

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2023, 08:34:11 PM »
For what its worth. Grafted jacks grow about half as fasts as seedlings (unless you pull the multi-rootstock trick). Something in the grafting slows them down. This is not an issue for mango in Florida (apparently it is an issue in California?). And Lychee is almost always air layered. So, it is normal for a grafted jackfruit to grow slower than lychee and mango.

Interesting you mention that- the nursery I bought it from (Tampa Tropical Asian Nursery) mentioned this characteristic of grafted Jackfruit.  He really tried to steer me toward the seedlings they had- but from what I had read, I was worried I might get a variation of the parent vs a true copy and it would be years before I found out.  Perhaps that concern is misplaced however because Jene's Tropicals here in town also seems to primarily sell seedings and she generally seems to know her stuff.

I did give them both Osmocote earlier in the spring but I do agree it looks like a nutrient deficiency is in play.

I Roundup'ed the lawn a couple weeks ago- the Bahia that my builder put in was DOT quality at best and full of weeds so I'm having it replaced, but that hasn't had any negative effects on any of my trees or landscaping.  However the thing I forgot to mention is that we have reclaimed water.  The higher salt content is known to be bad for things like azaleas but there is much research into which fruit trees can handle what.

brian

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2023, 08:38:02 PM »
My experience with Osmocote is that if you have any doubt if you provided enough, double or triple the application.  I have never had fertilizer burn with it and it turned out I was under-applying (I never measured, just guessed).  Now I go through quite a lot of Osmocote and my plants are happy. 

The plastic prills are annoying, though.   Ourdoors the UV sunlight will probably break down the plastic eventually but I'd love to see an alternative way of slow release fert for containers.

Galatians522

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2023, 06:28:25 AM »
Jackfruit has moderate resistance to saline soil while lychee and mango have poor resistance according to the ECHO Cataloge and Compendium of Warm Climate Fruits. So that does not sound like the issue.

Orkine

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2023, 10:33:19 AM »
Have you considered planting your backup 2 or 3 feet off center from the one you have now?  If both survive you have an interesting challenge, if the one you have does not grow well it will be crowded out, if both stall, perhaps it is something with that spot in your yard.


I grew two lychee this way and was able to get fruit from both for a number of years before the mite came along last year.  They are cut back now and I may remove them entirely but both tree did just fine.

Greater Good

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2023, 07:06:41 PM »
Hope you're not a weed n feed lawn type of person and expect your fruit trees to be happy.

K-Rimes

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Re: Is it dead?
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2023, 02:15:51 PM »
I find that most trees that get put in ground take between 1-2 years to really start cranking. If you had to transplant it, even ground to ground, you're resetting the clock. It looks like it is becoming vigorous now by the look of the canopy but I echo that they all look hungry.

The leaf damage looks like sunburn or a nutrient deficiency and that'll be solved by some fertilizer.

My vote would be to keep the in ground one, it's closer to blast off than the one in the pot. You're just resetting the clock again if you pull it out and put in the potted plant. I do like Orkine's suggestion to plant your other one real close and cull the loser.

 

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