Author Topic: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!  (Read 11473 times)


huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2014, 06:48:38 PM »


I gave to test two fruits to two friends:

... he tasted and waited to say something, do not put ugly face, at first he ate the shell and I told him it was better to eat only the pulp, then he called his wife and said her to prove the other fruit, she tried it and said "es riquísimo!", which means "it's yummy!" and then he said he liked and blueberries look similar for its external form, and she said blueberries are smaller.

For now, It's the only report that I have about other people (it would be better when I have enought fruits so the people can taste it properly), I'll tell you more later, but I am very happy.

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2014, 07:36:51 PM »
nice picture!!

thanks for sharing!

i can't wait to taste one...I have a few trees, about 4ft tall....

how big was your tree when it fruited? and does it have thorns? (I remember one of the forum members had a variety without thorns, maybe Ethan)
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huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2014, 08:21:42 PM »
nice picture!!

thanks for sharing!

i can't wait to taste one...I have a few trees, about 4ft tall....

how big was your tree when it fruited? and does it have thorns? (I remember one of the forum members had a variety without thorns, maybe Ethan)

Hi, taking good pictures will help to spread native fruit trees.

It's 3m tall, but one of the 4 years old flowered this spring, not set fruit for now. I think that a 4 years old guabiju could fruit, but the normal age is more than 6 years old.

All our guabijus have little thorns in the leaves that almost no puncture, but even they annoy me a bit when looking for ripe fruits. Here in argentina the "carayá" monkeys really like the fruit too, and they have no problems with the thorns, they use the trees as roost bedroom.

Oscar has guabijus without thorns :)

Sven

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2014, 08:31:25 PM »
Those fruits are beautiful Marcos, inside and out!  Your friends reaction is encouraging as well, I am glad they liked them.  I can’t wait to get some growing and to try the fruit, it looks wonderful.  Thanks for sharing the pictures and your experiences.  When you eat the skin can you eat all of it or do the flower parts (sepals?) have to be removed or spit out?

Tomas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2014, 08:41:30 PM »
Hello,

From your pictures, the fruits look so perfect (and yummy) with no blemishes of any kind. So this fruit is pretty free from pests?

Tomas



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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2014, 08:53:38 PM »
I'm wondering if they're resistant to fruit flies? Because they have fuzzy skin?

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huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2014, 10:03:01 PM »
Sven: I tried some fruits with flower sepals the last year, and they are too sour, so I prefer to remove them; but I like the skin. Now I am eating just the pulp because I want to understand better this flavour... I guess that a guabiju fell from the tree would be super sweet, I have to wait but it's very difficult to me :), as I like them a lot and cant wait for this to happen.

Anyway, for now I have to say that I prefer a very good grape over a guabiju; but I would prefer any good guabiju over a good grape.

Tomas: in our urban garden any fruit is free of pests and pesticides, but the citrics suffer from citrus canker (a bacteria) and sometimes the p. cattleianum was bitten by a bird.

They say guabijus attract a lot of birds (thrushes, etc..), But that has not happened yet here.

Overall Internet reports say that all native fruits (feijoa, pitanga, arazá, guabiju, ubajay, butiá, aguaí, etc) are free from pests and diseases here, the guabijú is said to have a "reasonable health" and is a typically long-lived tree,

See this 164 years old one at Uruguay:



Adam: I dont know... the skin is somewhat hard.

BTW: this is a good photo of the fuzzy skin:



« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 11:08:58 PM by huertasurbanas »

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2014, 10:46:36 PM »
I forgot to tell you something about my friends experience: they liked the fruit so they wanted to grow some tree from these 3 seeds (one fruit had 1 seed, the other one had 2), so I told them the exact instructions:

Sow without completely burying the seed: should get some light since it is a species with pioneering features, never over water the seed because it will die, nor let it dry (it is best to make a mini-greenhouse or if you have a proper greenhouse, better).

Usually they germinate between 30 and 40 days. Grow in the shade for 1 year, then it can take semi shade and then direct sunlight.

Up to +/- 3 years old they grow slowly, then the growth is moderate to rapid. Guabijus love water, given that naturally they grow to the banks of rivers in Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil.

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2014, 06:28:35 AM »
January, 6: size

From 2 to 2.5 cm, so they are bigger than usual, but not sooo big.


huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2014, 10:32:35 AM »
Today guabijus (not fully mature, were good but they had not yet fallen tree [see the photo above]) were tested by 3 women, one aged 37, and two 65 years old or so. The first woman peeled the fruit and said it smelled like orange, then ate the flesh and said it was something like the scent of eucalyptus leaves, but much less strong, the taste was not that, it was different, and said the pulp texture (not the flavour) was like the texture of a very ripe peach (it was the more ripe fruit of all these batch), or custard. She liked the fruit but not so much the pulp closer to the seed because it is somewhat "slimy". A personal taste, she dont like most of the foods in the world!

Another lady bited the fruit peel and all and tasted the flesh, spitting the shell. said "me ecantó!" which means, "I loved it!"; she tasted two fruits; and the last lady said she liked it and it was very sweet... when I asked if it remembered some fruit, said "grapes ". :)

Tomas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2014, 10:42:03 AM »
Hello,

Sounds like Myrcianthes pungens is a great fruit to try to grow. Do you know if there are any cultivated varieties yet or if there is any research about it?

Tomas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2014, 10:45:07 AM »
Hello,

Sounds like Myrcianthes pungens is a great fruit to try to grow. Do you know if there are any cultivated varieties yet or if there is any research about it?

Tomas
Yes, i will try it too... this fruits seams to be great!  :P

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2014, 05:28:40 PM »
Hi Huertas, nice reports and photos...keep it up. FYI i remember Anestor in Santa Catarina, Brazil, the fellow that has the thousands of photos on Picasa, told me when i visited him that this is one of his favorite fruits. When he told me that i made a mental note to make SURE to plant it.  ;)
Oscar

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2014, 05:48:39 PM »
Hello,

Sounds like Myrcianthes pungens is a great fruit to try to grow. Do you know if there are any cultivated varieties yet or if there is any research about it?

Tomas

Yes, there are some researches about it, at Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil.

About antioxidants:

http://www.huertasurbanas.com/2012/10/07/comparativo-nutricional-antioxidantes-en-arandanos-vs-guaviyu-pitanga-araza-guayabo/

At URUGUAY: ºbrix (12 to 18) and % of pulp (69 to 78):
http://www.guayubira.org.uy/monte/seminario2010/Vignale-frutales.pdf

About recipes:
http://www.peregrinagourmet.com/2013/01/uruguay-rescata-sus-frutos-autoctonos.html

About antioxidants (Brazil):
http://www.lume.ufrgs.br/bitstream/handle/10183/60386/000837776.pdf?sequence=1

The IX-6 variety of Uruguay seems to be very good, with 18º brix and 78% of pulp, we have to get it ;-)

But I'm assuming that this variety that I have planted is pretty good, I expect that the fruits fall from the tree to see how sweet it can be.

OSCAR:
Yes! AMAZING. I read what you wrote on another post about Anestor and it really surprised me, since the fruits from Buenos Aires (now I see they were unripe) I tried last year were not as good as our fruits.

Are your plants from his favourite tree?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 07:55:16 PM by huertasurbanas »

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2014, 07:53:26 PM »
Just visited a 55 years old friend and I took him five guabijus to try (not 100% ripe yet, but tasty). He has an almost identical tree to mine, with the same origin and same size, but not yet beared fruits (it wasnt well watered and in the winter covered it with a blanket wrongly, because he thought it would not survive the frosts of -6 º C), so: not well maintained.

He tasted the first fruit of my tree and said it lacked flavor, then tried another and another and said the same. He expected the acidity of p. cattleianum, talking a little more, we conclude that he likes markedly acidic fruits, then he did not loved it (neither he found it ugly).

I tried another fruit from this batch to see if there was some "extrange problem" but no: I liked it as any other guabiju, it was very sweet and pleasant. So: for People that expect an acid fruit, this is not the one!
« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 09:09:09 PM by huertasurbanas »

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2014, 09:57:35 AM »


The fruit of the medium in the photo is the first to fall off the tree, which means it is fully mature. Beyond that is completely black, I see no significant differences with the other 2 immature fruits: sepals have the same color, for example.

I tried it and it was great, not much better than the others previously harvested black, but it was the best yet: the sweetest.

Of course, the relatively tough skin prevents damage when they reach the floor. I think this is the proper way to harvest them, as the Feijoas, expected to hit the floor and even then wait 1 or 2 days... something I will try soon.



Speaking of Feijoas, now I think I've found something similar between guabiju and Feijoas: the taste  of the petals of Feijoas has something somewhat bitter and sweet that resembles the mature guabiju pulp.

Curiously, the other two fruits on the side were harvested when they were dark purple (not fully mature) by mistake yesterday, with a single day of ripening at 28 ° C approx in this house, I tried one of them, the most black, and was a more bitter than the one fallen of the tree, it is curious that it had 4 seeds: so far no one had so many, I think it is a rarity, some 1 in 40 fruits. In fact, the best balance between pulp and seeds was in the little one, with 1 single seed.

I should wait till the sepals are totally black as in this photo from a guy at Uruguay:

« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 10:06:59 AM by huertasurbanas »

Luisport

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2014, 10:06:15 AM »
Hi! My friend, can you reserve some seeds to me? I will hask is Miguel have any guabiju plant available, but if he don't have any i will hasl you to send me some seeds, ok? Thank's! :)

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2014, 10:10:06 AM »
Of course Luis! Just give me your address in private message or mail (marcos ovejafm.com)

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2014, 10:14:44 AM »
Of course Luis! Just give me your address in private message or mail (marcos ovejafm.com)
Thank's! I will try to arrange it here first... i will tell you if i can't get guabiju here.  ;)

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2014, 02:46:38 PM »
Oscar, I found what Anestor said:

"The fruits are very tasty. I consider it the most delicious fruit I have ever eaten. Despite being the time of ripening of fruits and the trees on the sidewalks are heavily loaded, only harvested a few, it was passing along with others."

It's crazy, my guabijus are very good but I dont know if they are the best fruit I ever eaten: I like acid fruits more... but, anyway! I'll have to wait for weeks, months, years to test and see how many flavors of fruits grow on me, currently I really miss guavas, p. cattleianum and I have a lot of curiosity about Uvaia or sete capotes, among others ... I think I'll like the jaboticaba, the black sapote and abiu, but also as the other Brazilian cerecitas: grumixama etc..

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2014, 05:45:02 PM »
Oscar, I found what Anestor said:

"The fruits are very tasty. I consider it the most delicious fruit I have ever eaten. Despite being the time of ripening of fruits and the trees on the sidewalks are heavily loaded, only harvested a few, it was passing along with others."

It's crazy, my guabijus are very good but I dont know if they are the best fruit I ever eaten: I like acid fruits more... but, anyway! I'll have to wait for weeks, months, years to test and see how many flavors of fruits grow on me, currently I really miss guavas, p. cattleianum and I have a lot of curiosity about Uvaia or sete capotes, among others ... I think I'll like the jaboticaba, the black sapote and abiu, but also as the other Brazilian cerecitas: grumixama etc..

I doubt very many people will think guabiju is the best fruit they have ever eaten. Yet it is still quite a compliment from a person who has tasted and has access to very many fruits! I wonder also just how much variation there is in this fruit? Does Anestor maybe have the very best tasting guabijus on the planet?  ;) Or are his taste buds that much different from everybody else? I guess i will have to visit him again some day during guabiju season to really find out the truth.
Oscar

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2014, 06:02:28 PM »
Hehe, I am suspecting he is a bit crazy like many of us...

I understand what you are saying, as a "fruit collector thing", a lot of rare fruits for different collectors can be the "best in the world". If guabiju would be so good, anybody at Brazil should knew it.

What I like about this plant is the good taste, the promise of antioxidant activity (it would be nice to see some nutrition facts about vitamins and minerals, but maybe no one did it yet), the longevity, frost resistance (-10º C or so) and because it is very very easy to grow (when mature tree) and fruit.

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2014, 07:09:29 PM »
Hehe, I am suspecting he is a bit crazy like many of us...

I understand what you are saying, as a "fruit collector thing", a lot of rare fruits for different collectors can be the "best in the world". If guabiju would be so good, anybody at Brazil should knew it.

What I like about this plant is the good taste, the promise of antioxidant activity (it would be nice to see some nutrition facts about vitamins and minerals, but maybe no one did it yet), the longevity, frost resistance (-10º C or so) and because it is very very easy to grow (when mature tree) and fruit.

Well there are fruits that are extremely good that almost nobody knows about. For example, in California i was always surprised that more people didn't know about cherimoyas and white sapote. Here i am surprised that so many people born and raised here don't even know what a jackfruit is.  :o I don't think guabiju is very common in Brazil, so they can be very good quality and still most don't know about it.
Oscar

huertasurbanas

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Re: Tasting the first guabijus from our own tree!
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2014, 08:06:48 PM »
You are right, even planted on the city squares, people may ignore the trees and fruits, and/or be afraid about eating something unknown: this is what happens here in Argentina (Buenos Aires, Salta, Tucumán, etc.) and Uruguay, as Ricardo Carrere reported (http://www.guayubira.org.uy/monte/Guaviyu.pdf).


Anestor was talking about trees of the city, maybe they are excelent varieties:

"I've been there a few days in my hometown (São Domingos do Sul - RS), where Guabiju is planted in afforestation of streets. The fruits are very tasty. I consider it the most delicious fruit I have ever eaten. Despite being the time of ripening of fruits and the trees on the sidewalks are heavily loaded, only harvested a few, it was passing along with others."

Anyway, they say guabiju is very variable, so it may be the case of E. uniflora: some of them are horrible and some excelent... in the middle, you have a lot.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 09:50:59 PM by huertasurbanas »

 

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