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Messages - Millet

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Freeze damage recovery
« on: May 05, 2021, 11:01:06 PM »
he trunk split due to freezing.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Grafting pomello on lemon
« on: May 05, 2021, 11:27:11 AM »
Lemons root very easily. Leave 2 or 3 leaves attached, strip of the lower leaves. Use current flush stems, but after they are fully matured and turned woody.   Wound the base of the cutting by removing two thin strips of bark, maybe 1/2" - 3/4" long from the base on opposite sides of the stem, then dipping in a rooting hormone.  Super easy varieties like calamondin and most lemons may need little to no hormone. Cover with plastic bag. Dip-N-Grow is often used, diluted 1:10 or 1:6 in water. Rooting in containers demand being shaded at mid day or they will cook.

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lemon tree help
« on: May 04, 2021, 06:29:56 PM »
Following upon Brian's post what exactly is the fertilizer program schedule and the fertilizer formulation that you use?

4
Citrus General Discussion / May 4, 2021
« on: May 04, 2021, 12:14:43 PM »
Today, May 4, is National OJ Day.

5
There are a few different rootstocks available for mandarins. The most popular are C-35, Carrizo, and Flying Dragon. C-35 and Carrizo are the standard tree size with C-35 being slightly smaller of the two. Flying Dragon is a semi-dwarf rootstock.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Blob on citrus tree
« on: May 03, 2021, 04:12:24 PM »
Beware of making the enclosure too air tight.  The tree requires air to supply the tree's need for CO2

7
 Spaugh, C35 rootstock has good compatibility with all oranges, grapefruit and lemons except Eureka.   Compatibility with mandarins/ satsumas is complex and not well understood.  Nearly all mandarins/satsumas perform well for at least 10 to 15 years, but many eventually develop bud union crease and decline.  This decline is the same with many of the common rootstocks.  (Taken from  the Citrus Production Manual.)

8
At the supermarket I shop at they sell 4 or 5 cultivars of citrus.   A price is shown for all varieties except one. Sumo never have a price listed.  Must be due to the high price that they sell for.  If people seen the price they would not buy them.

9
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: New citrus tree in ground
« on: May 02, 2021, 12:40:34 PM »
Citradia that is a nice looking Meiwa.  Probably the only in ground mountain top Meiwa in the USA.

10
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Leaf miner on new grafts
« on: May 02, 2021, 12:33:15 PM »
The miner will be at the end of the trail.  With a tree as small as yours is presently it should be quick and easy.

11
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: New citrus tree in ground
« on: May 01, 2021, 04:26:55 PM »
Poncirusguy, you seem to have an eye for kumquats.  How many do you have now?

12
Just being grown in air root pruning containers, the trees will naturally grow to be smaller than In ground trees.  Thus they can be planted much closer together.  Red Grapefruit as a variety has shown the best results as to greater production, and higher fruit quality when grown by container production under screen. As for fertilizing and watering I don't think that will result in higher labor, as that is not done by man, but mechanicly by computer.

13
Citrus General Discussion / Oak Leaves Research & HLB
« on: April 26, 2021, 05:02:04 PM »
UF research into oak lives and HLB to find what is in oak trees that apparently helps citrus cope with HLB.  .  Researchers have found that applying Oak leaves around citrus trees increased phosphorous, magnesium and potassium levels in the soil.  Further as the leaves were broken down, oil organic matter increased plus more water was trapped in the soil. Over the next two years, Hallman and his research partners at the USDA hope to identify which compounds are beneficial, where those compounds are found in the tree, which oak species hold these compounds and how much of the right compounds will control the disease. 

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: getting fukushu ready for summer
« on: April 22, 2021, 08:29:23 PM »
Nice looking tree.

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Big pot size for citrus?
« on: April 20, 2021, 10:06:10 PM »
I also like Longwood Gardens rolling benches.  With the rolling benches they only need one open pathway in the entire greenhouse.  When they require another isle, they just slide an isle any where they need it.  Can be done in one minute.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Big pot size for citrus?
« on: April 20, 2021, 09:22:42 PM »
I went to Longwood gardens to see their 4th of July fireworks show.   We also sell chemicals to Longwood.  As for the containers that are shown in Brian's post, I like the square sided one much better then the round white one. One of the sides on the square container open up so the tree can be repotted .

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Big pot size for citrus?
« on: April 20, 2021, 05:53:20 PM »
letmung has a good point.  In Italy there are famous centenarian citrus trees that have been growing in the same container for 100 years and are still healthy.   What the caretakers of these trees do, is cut and remove 1 inch to 1.5 inches around the entire side of the rootball, and replace with new medium.  This is done every year.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Big pot size for citrus?
« on: April 19, 2021, 11:18:07 AM »
SonoraOrlando,  no matter what you do, you will always have to repot every 3 to 4 years  Either repot or lose the tree.  The size container you start out with, has a lot to do with the size of tree and its root system, that you start with.

22
I have found that some citrus such as calamondin, lemons etc. do root easy, but some don't. 

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Calamansi wont fruit
« on: April 17, 2021, 12:33:04 PM »
In my estimation, your 5-6 year old tree will still require 2 or 3 more years before it is capable of producing fruit.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Endangered Bees
« on: April 16, 2021, 10:56:45 PM »
The publication  Citrus Industry. Net had an article on...An attempt to place bees under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) by reclassifying them as fish has been blocked by California Judge James Arguelles.

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: US-1284, SCS rootstocks
« on: April 16, 2021, 11:13:11 AM »
Sun Chu Sha (SCS) is a mandarin type that has been considered promising as a rootstock in Florida, but testing in California gave disappointing results.  Yields have been lower than trees on Carrizo, but produces a tree about as large as Carrizo.  SCS is susceptible to Phytophthora and citrus nematodes,  but tolerant to CTV.  Its main strength is that it is tolerant to calcareous soils. There is probably little reason to use this rootstock except on calcareous soils.  Info. taken from the Citrus Production Manual.

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