Author Topic: Shiikuwasha  (Read 3950 times)

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2020, 09:33:50 AM »

Probably all these crosses were realized many times in Japan.
[/quote]

I am sure of that. But they are not available to us, or if they did probably they have a patent and not release them. There are many crosses which use protoplasm fusion, in the next 10-15 years maybe they will come on the market.

Nikorasu972

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2020, 04:22:22 AM »
Since it does exist in the quarantine collection, I will be aiming to acquire some this year.
Where is the quarantine collection? I'm interested in getting some too.

containerman

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2020, 09:13:35 AM »
I sourced my 'Shekwasha' (and Nasnaran) from JRozier around 15 years ago. He got his original start from Woodlanders as a seedling in the mid '90's. I can't find my pics of it but he has great pics of the fruit here:

http://citrusgrowersstatic.chez.com/web/viewtopic75c3-3.php


wow the fruit is small like a kishu.

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2020, 07:34:16 PM »
Yes fruit is small. Very sour, but a good substitute for limes..



lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2021, 03:53:09 PM »
I waited to get the fruits very ripe on the tree.
They get sweeter once they are very done.





lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2021, 06:56:24 PM »
Fruit when ripe turns sweet with an intersting aroma


incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2021, 08:25:01 AM »



I too have a shikuwasa, bought it because it was cold hardy, so far it's been inside the greenhouse protected from snow and cold but it's vigorously flowering and growing new branches.
If I knew before hand the pursha lime would be so extremely sensitive to temperature change (a large tree of 30cm pot size diameter) lost half its leaves due to a hot spring day spike and it could not handle 40C inside greenhouse) I would not have gotten it and gotten an extra shikuwasa instead, they seem very interesting plants and t didn't suffer at all from these temperature changes :)

@lebmung : inside air was too dry here, moved everything elsewhere, increased survival chances.

pop_kun

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2021, 12:11:18 PM »
So sad CCPP doesnt have Shiikuwasha. Its one of my favorite citrus and i look everywhere for it whenever I'm in Japan.

Maybe one day...

containerman

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2021, 07:17:22 PM »
So sad CCPP doesnt have Shiikuwasha. Its one of my favorite citrus and i look everywhere for it whenever I'm in Japan.

Maybe one day...
I grew up in Hayward and went to mt eden and chabot college. Its a better area than modesto for citrus and avocado trees.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2021, 03:01:24 PM »
Not so sure what you have. Shiikuwasha is not supposed to be cold hardy as it comes form Okinawa, a subtropical climate. C. tachibana which looks similar and from the same area it's cold hardy to -8 to -10 C
I didn't test it because here we had a very warm winter.
What I can say that when it was -1C for a night new growth just died as compared to Keraji which didn't suffer anything. So I expect it to be similar to lemon.

I left mine in the greenhouse uncovered when it was 0C outside and probably 1 C in the greenhouse and it started growing anyway in march.
I too found it was cold hardy until -7/8 to -10 C and I really hope that is true because so far it has been my most favorite plant, it barely lost anything compared to a pursha a,d mine is now also flowering (and still growing new branches and leaves all over the place)
I bought a second one because this seems to be one I can easily work with :)

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2021, 05:43:21 PM »

I left mine in the greenhouse uncovered when it was 0C outside and probably 1 C in the greenhouse and it started growing anyway in march.
I too found it was cold hardy until -7/8 to -10 C and I really hope that is true because so far it has been my most favorite plant, it barely lost anything compared to a pursha a,d mine is now also flowering (and still growing new branches and leaves all over the place)
I bought a second one because this seems to be one I can easily work with :)
[/quote]

Tested this winter yes down to -8C it can survive although autumn growth dies.
Almost all the nurseries in Europe sell Shikuawasha on Alemow rootstock. The rootstock will die at -2C to 0C or before most likely because of root rot. I usually toss to compost or give to someone those plants with Alemow, they all get root problems after few years.
I have my plants on PT.
This year I will graft few plants on Shikuwasha seedlings and test it for hardiness as well. Although on its own it is not resistant to root rot.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2021, 06:59:49 AM »

Tested this winter yes down to -8C it can survive although autumn growth dies.
Almost all the nurseries in Europe sell Shikuawasha on Alemow rootstock. The rootstock will die at -2C to 0C or before most likely because of root rot. I usually toss to compost or give to someone those plants with Alemow, they all get root problems after few years.
I have my plants on PT.
This year I will graft few plants on Shikuwasha seedlings and test it for hardiness as well. Although on its own it is not resistant to root rot.

I don't think oscar tintori uses alemow, they mainly use Poncius trifoliate and so far mine has survived longer than any alemow plants i bought from local sellers. (well you already know my background)

I ordered a second one from them, though I hope this one will have greener foliage because as you can see on the picture mine has yellowish leaves, some turned much greener already but the rest remains.
Otherwise plant is in good health,  I left it outside at 0C in februari and nothing died, though it did not have new growth, only new flowers but they did not fall off.
I do would like to know how you got the leaves of yours to be so very large and dark green though, I already give nutrients with enough N in it but maybe you do / give something extra ?

Radoslav

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2021, 11:40:15 AM »

Tested this winter yes down to -8C it can survive although autumn growth dies.
Almost all the nurseries in Europe sell Shikuawasha on Alemow rootstock. The rootstock will die at -2C to 0C or before most likely because of root rot. I usually toss to compost or give to someone those plants with Alemow, they all get root problems after few years.
I have my plants on PT.
This year I will graft few plants on Shikuwasha seedlings and test it for hardiness as well. Although on its own it is not resistant to root rot.

I don't think oscar tintori uses alemow, they mainly use Poncius trifoliate and so far mine has survived longer than any alemow plants i bought from local sellers. (well you already know my background)

I ordered a second one from them, though I hope this one will have greener foliage because as you can see on the picture mine has yellowish leaves, some turned much greener already but the rest remains.
Otherwise plant is in good health,  I left it outside at 0C in februari and nothing died, though it did not have new growth, only new flowers but they did not fall off.
I do would like to know how you got the leaves of yours to be so very large and dark green though, I already give nutrients with enough N in it but maybe you do / give something extra ?

I visited tintori in the past and also bought many plants from them. They never used poncirus as rootstock. All plants were grafted on macrophylla or volkameriana.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2021, 02:33:29 PM »
I visited tintori in the past and also bought many plants from them. They never used poncirus as rootstock. All plants were grafted on macrophylla or volkameriana.

Ah I see, then I was misinformed. I stand corrected.

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2021, 07:25:56 PM »
I visited tintori in the past and also bought many plants from them. They never used poncirus as rootstock. All plants were grafted on macrophylla or volkameriana.

Ah I see, then I was misinformed. I stand corrected.

I can confirm oscar tintori uses macrophylla. No Italian nursery uses poncirus as a rootstock. It is obvious that it takes 3 times longer to grow than on alemow, plus the temps there are not so low during the winter. There is a lot of market competition and the average person doesn't care about the rootstock, so price has to be down.

If you plan to plant them in soil in your unheated greenhouse, the cold and humidity during the winter is going to kill the rootstock.
Quote
Left it outside at 0C
well at near 0 they don't freeze, it has a lot of thermal sink around. But once temps start to be -3C for a day, you will see damage.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2021, 05:46:11 AM »
If you plan to plant them in soil in your unheated greenhouse, the cold and humidity during the winter is going to kill the rootstock.
Quote
Left it outside at 0C
well at near 0 they don't freeze, it has a lot of thermal sink around. But once temps start to be -3C for a day, you will see damage.

Don't worry, I will not plant it in full soil anymore. I planted every citrus in containers, except a kumquat seedling, just for the fun of it ;)
The next nights we get -2 C so I did cover all of them with a frost cloth inside the unheated greenhouse just to be sure the new growth will not die. I can confirm shikuwasa is a good grower, perhaps a bit slower than others but once it got started it got new buds on many places and grow fast.
As for reference, I was told by a dutch citrus specialist that most citrus were grafted on PT however since I saw many differences on the grafts of the ones on Oscar Tintori's plants I already found it odd. I do know from the same person that Oscar tintori is to be trusted in terms of having good plants, much better than whatever I had before from local stores.
My only issue (personally) is that I should not buy very young cuttings or recent grafted plants, I do not have the proper experience yet to care for them and make sure they survive winter. Maybe in the future :)

pagnr

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2021, 07:52:34 AM »
So sad CCPP doesnt have Shiikuwasha. Its one of my favorite citrus and i look everywhere for it whenever I'm in Japan.

Any particular places to look for Citrus fruit in Japan ??
I've only tried supermarkets, fruit shops and sometimes gardens.
Not much too unusual there.

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #42 on: April 12, 2021, 06:57:29 AM »
This is my Shiikuwasha for sale 25, 3 years old, grafted on poncirus trifoliata which took -25C. Shipping only to EU.
Those interested in seeds I also have at 5 for 6 seeds, germination 100%.



Millet

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #43 on: April 12, 2021, 11:22:57 AM »
About Shikuwasha and Okinawa.  I lived on Okinawa for two years,  never seen the fruit offered in restaurants as a relish, never seen a Shikuwasha tree, never even heard the word Shikuwasha spoken.  That certainly does not mean that Shikuwasha was not grown their, but it must not have been all that common either.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #44 on: April 12, 2021, 12:37:32 PM »
This is my Shiikuwasha for sale 25, 3 years old, grafted on poncirus trifoliata which took -25C. Shipping only to EU.
Those interested in seeds I also have at 5 for 6 seeds, germination 100%.



I am definitely interested in the Shiikuwasha plant, I promise i'll take good care of it! I have sent you a PM

Laaz

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #45 on: April 12, 2021, 09:55:03 PM »
Check the spelling... Shekwasha.

incubator01

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #46 on: April 13, 2021, 03:23:08 AM »
Check the spelling... Shekwasha.

It has many names:, quote from wikipedia:
Citrus depressa (Citrus depressa, formerly C. pectinifera, Okinawan: シークヮーサー/シークァーサー shiikwaasa, Japanese: ヒラミレモン hirami remon or シークワーサー shīkuwāsā), in English sometimes called shiikuwasha, shequasar, Taiwan tangerine, Okinawa lime,[1] flat lemon, hirami lemon, or thin-skinned flat lemon

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2021, 02:30:19 PM »

lebmung

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #48 on: April 20, 2021, 06:17:56 PM »
3 weeks old seedlings, quite vigourous.



pop_kun

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Re: Shiikuwasha
« Reply #49 on: April 20, 2021, 10:23:04 PM »
Any particular places to look for Citrus fruit in Japan ??
I've only tried supermarkets, fruit shops and sometimes gardens.
Not much too unusual there.

My experiences are about the same in regards to unusual findings, at least for fresh varieties. Some of the fresh fruit stores in Ginza have some of the most amazing fruits, ridiculousy delicious muscat grapes, but not too much citrus in the forefront.  The great finds for me are usually in the artisan shop stalls at various shopping centers, like the ones that have a whole floor dedicated to food. I found a place (also in Ginza) that had some Shiikuwasa drinking vinegar. I was so sad to finish my bottle... I still dream of that vinegar...