Author Topic: Royal Crimson Cherry  (Read 738 times)

Sandyb

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Royal Crimson Cherry
« on: November 26, 2020, 07:03:46 PM »
I have a Royal Crimson Cherry that was planted in the ground on 2-18-2020, and it is doing extremely well (Granada Hills, Ca 9B)  I am very happy with the growth and leaf production.
I have two questions:
1) about half way up the trunk, there has formed, (what my wife calls a “knuckle”  I’d call it a knot...
Any ideas what, or why?
2) it has grown to about 10’ tall... should I just lop it off a the height I want to keep it? Angle cut?
Thanks....sandy


spaugh

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2020, 08:38:19 PM »
Cherry trees get super tall then you can't reach the fruit.  They grow straight up for the most part without training. You should lop it off at about 18" off the ground and start training it to be short and bushy by trimming down long growth. 

You want to do this and get the tree trained now as the fruit forms on 3 year old growth.  Trust me on this I have several fruiting cherry trees including the one you posted about. 
« Last Edit: November 27, 2020, 08:40:08 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

SoCal2warm

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2020, 08:56:54 PM »
1) about half way up the trunk, there has formed, (what my wife calls a “knuckle”  I’d call it a knot...
Any ideas what, or why?
I think I see what you mean.

At this point, it is kind of late to do anything about it. If you cut it back, it will severely set your cherry tree back, which is something you don't want in your climate, because cherry trees can be kind of difficult to grow and slow growing there.

It probably originated when the leading tip got damaged, when the tree was much younger, so it could not keep growing straight, and there was an offshoot branch very close to the tip that started growing. It will probably be okay, but may not be the most ideal situation, since it will ultimately make the top leading branch weaker and easier to break when it grows bigger and becomes heavier.
On the other hand, at some distant point in the future, assuming it does not break, then eventually the knuckle will start being grown over by the expanding diameter of the trunk and be less prominent.

One thing you might try doing is girdling at the knuckle point to prevent all the growth from continuing to be directed there. Then hopefully the tree might send out another leading branch below that line.

If you simply just lop off the top, growth is still going to be directed towards that branch above the knuckle point, and it will likely send of another two branches.
Girdling right below the knuckle point might be a better way to go. Since this is a less desirable branch, you could also of course then cut it back to whatever desired height you wanted to maintain.
But consider this: If you cut it back and then allow it to keep growing after that, you may likely have another knuckle!
« Last Edit: November 29, 2020, 09:09:10 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2020, 09:12:18 PM »
Cherry trees get super tall then you can't reach the fruit.  They grow straight up for the most part without training.
Actually in this type of climate, I'm just happy that cherry trees can put on whatever growth they are able to.
I personally like big trees and am willing to use a ladder, but that may not be for everyone.

A taller tree can be harder to put a net around, but on the other hand all the cherries at the top might be enough to divert birds from eating too many of the lower cherries (or it could just attract more birds, so that might not work).

spaugh

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2020, 02:48:07 AM »
I dont know what you mean by just happy with what growth thry put on?  Is that in southern CA?  My cherry trees are extremely vigorous here in san diego?
Brad Spaugh

SoCal2warm

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2020, 07:19:36 PM »
Is that in southern CA?  My cherry trees are extremely vigorous here in san diego?
Yes it is. I don't know what part of San Diego you live in, maybe at a little bit of a higher elevation. It could also be the cooler ocean breezes that help cherry trees. They don't seem to do so well even a little bit further inland (I'm talking about in zone 10).

Have your cherry trees produced much fruit?


spaugh

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2020, 07:38:09 PM »
Its probably the rootstock or type of cherry tree if it isn't growing well for you.  My place is 16 miles inland in a HOT area.  1150ft elevation.  The heat is what makes them grow fast.  Theres not much else growing as fast, maybe only apricots and nectarines.  They grow cherries in the central valley which is super hot, no coastal influence, no elevation.  Yes they make lots of cherries, they flowered nicely this year.  Minnie royal and royal Lee fruited nicely.  I have this royal crimson planted between these 2 trees as a pollinator.

I do have a lapins tree that doesn't grow as well and doesn't flower.  Its on some other rootstock also. I'll probably replace it with a Minnie royal/Royal Lee. 

If you guys and girls are interested in which rootstocks, I can dig up the tags and post it.

« Last Edit: December 01, 2020, 07:50:02 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

johngonole

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2021, 02:57:20 AM »
How many years has it taken for your Royal Crimson to bloom.   I transplanted a two year old tree last year so it is now three years old.   Leafing out here in Florida but it doesn't seem like it is going to bloom.  Sadly I had a huge accident when transplanting, tree was weak for a while, and I think it got bacterial cancer which I cut and burned out.   That said it sill has enough bark on the trunk to leaf out this spring.   It is just now leafing out.   

We had over 400 chill hours so I think I'm good on the chill requirements here.    Just wondering at what year I should expect it to start blooming.   It is on Maxma root stock.   

spaugh

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Re: Royal Crimson Cherry
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2021, 11:45:37 AM »
it takes 3 years to get fruit.
Brad Spaugh