Author Topic: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse  (Read 383 times)

incubator01

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cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« on: February 21, 2021, 08:42:23 AM »
I'm getting a Kumquat and shikuwasa soon because they're cold hardy for our winters and I don't have to worry too much about the plant dying from the cold (though I will protect it) but I prefer to plant these in full soil, not in containers in the greenhouse (because that's where I can plant whatever i want).
My question is, will such citrus survive warmer summers? Often I have potted citrus that get dried out leaves when the sun shines and the temperature rises above 32 °C, even during heat waves inside the greenhouse it gets to 50 °C.
The greenhouse is 4.5m long, 3m wide and 2.7m high, the sunny side has a shade cloth because the whole thing gets plenty of sun light anyway and has 4 windows and a double door. Naturally I open up everything completely when temps rise above 25 °C but I just want to make sure that I'm not making a stupid decision of planting these in the greenhouse.
As to why I want them in full soil:
- I prefer to limit the  citrus in containers
- Full soil has better moisture management and root development for long term
- no need to hassle with giant containers in the later phases.


Ilya11

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2021, 09:46:08 AM »
 I guess that with proper ventilation and shading you can avoid +50C in the greenhouse. Most citruses will not survive such heat.
As to the winter, unheated greenhouse is not particularly effective under long anticyclonic freezes. Kumquats are rather hardy, but only at   vegetation rest. They are late and fruits will be damaged before ripe.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

poncirsguy

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2021, 10:05:19 AM »
What kind of kumquat are you getting.  My kumquats produce fruit January through March.

February picture

incubator01

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2021, 10:18:51 AM »
What kind of kumquat are you getting.  My kumquats produce fruit January through March.

February picture

I'm getting the Fortunella Reale, oval kumquat.

Our winter temperatures usually float around -4 to -7°C but last winter we had an exceptionally cold one of -10°C.
I was going to cover them up with a fleece cover regardless but still, the summer is worrying me more.
I do not have the accommodation or space to place ventilation systems in the greenhouse. Only the 4 windows and double door to open up.

maesy

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2021, 01:49:23 PM »
Why don't you plant them outside and just cover them for the occasionally cold nights you can get?

kumin

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2021, 02:41:50 PM »
If trees only need short-term intermittent protection, they could be planted under a skeletal framework, then only covered when then need arises. Having a durable skeleton would provide rigid protection against snow and wind. Having removable cover materials would allow for all the ventilation needed. 

incubator01

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2021, 03:22:53 PM »
Why don't you plant them outside and just cover them for the occasionally cold nights you can get?

First of all not every part of my garden is for me alone, that's why I have a greenhouse. This means I also cannot plant them outside and build a rigid construction around it, because the heavy wind in january / february would blow it away if these parts are removable. (Yes even the roof of my garage got lifted by the wind once)

Second, it rains a lot here, when it does, it rains for 3 weeks pretty much non stop. Any citrus would drown in it. No matter how well draining the garden soil would be.

poncirsguy

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2021, 08:35:51 PM »
incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago



incubator01

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2021, 05:53:26 AM »
incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago



No, it's latin name is Fortunella Margarita.
That plant looks very nice, I'm also growing a few kumquat from seed, just to see what it will do in many years :)

incubator01

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #9 on: Today at 11:00:47 AM »
incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago



Sorry for the extremely late reply but I have to correct my previous response.
The seller does label my kumquat as Nagami.
And since I recently noticed that one of the 2 is starting to lose a lot of leaves because of the many winds (I do place them behind a wall when sunny ot get the sun or under a patio when windy/storm etc but no matter what, both locations seem to bother the kumquat wind-wise.
One of them is in my greenhouse and is literally enjoying himself like hell (growing new branches, leaves, riping fruits etc), the other one in a bigger pot (yes I know, the pot is too big but I take care to prevent root rot) is outside on either of mentioned locations.
But the past weeks we have very bad rainy windy weather with thunderstorms.
So I am heavily considering moving that one to my greenhouse too in the future.

The following website ( https://www.plantfoodathome.com/kumquat-tree/ ) mentions the nagami can handle 38+ °C ( 100+ degrees F) so if that is true, then I think it's better to move him inside the greenhouse.

Again sorry for not figuring this out sooner :(

tedburn

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #10 on: Today at 02:09:59 PM »
I have my greenhause since last autumn. And by reading your question and Ilyas answer, I also asked me what to do in summer. I have a heating system for winter which I could also use for ventilation in summer. But by thinking about I had the idea additional to the door and the window taking out a wall panel, perhaps then this is sufficient to limit the heat to under 40 degree Celsius. Perhaps this is also possible in your greenhouse ( if this works) ?

incubator01

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Re: cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse
« Reply #11 on: Today at 03:08:16 PM »
I have my greenhause since last autumn. And by reading your question and Ilyas answer, I also asked me what to do in summer. I have a heating system for winter which I could also use for ventilation in summer. But by thinking about I had the idea additional to the door and the window taking out a wall panel, perhaps then this is sufficient to limit the heat to under 40 degree Celsius. Perhaps this is also possible in your greenhouse ( if this works) ?

Unfortunately I cannot remove wall panels, definitely not without breaking anything , especially the warranty xD
No, if we do get another heat wave I will have to move it out of the greenhouse again but then there is also almost no wind, but right now and under normal summer temps, it should survive