Citrus > Cold Hardy Citrus

Yuzu Ichang Papeda cross

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SoCal2warm:

--- Quote from: Zitrusgaertner on May 10, 2021, 07:09:58 AM ---I am really bad at posting pictures but believe me, I have a seedling of Ichangensis IVIA in my garden that now is in ground for round ten years. Is is 150cm high and was never protected and was never damaged from cold. Is is deeply green an looks much healthier than my poncirus which does not like the soil. It seems to be much more resistant to limestone than PT.

--- End quote ---
You say you are in Vienna, zone 7b.
Do you think you might be in a part of the city that is actually more like 8a ?
Thank you for sharing the picture and information about your Ichang papeda growing there.

I wonder why my Ichang papedas don't appear to be looking as hardy. Maybe what I have is a different cultivar of Ichang papeda that is not as hardy? Maybe something about the climate here, with its wet winters and lack of heat in the early part of the year?


One additional piece of evidence that points to Yuzu being more likely to be a hybrid is that it is always full of many seeds, and most of those seeds are nucellar, whereas Ichang papeda often seems to have almost no seeds, presumably due to not being pollinated by a different variety, and I think the seeds in Ichang papeda are zygotic.
Typically hybridization (between different species) often results in that sort of situation.

Zitrusgaertner:

--- Quote from: mikkel on May 10, 2021, 04:51:51 PM ---@Zitrusgaertner Bernhard Voss has an Ichang Papeda at a similiar size of yours. And hardy since years.
Where did you get your plant from?

--- End quote ---
The seeds came from Bernhard Voss, as far as I can remember. He told me that IVIA would not be very hardy. I kept the young seedlings in the open ground for 3 years. Together with a craftet "very hardy" ichangensis that came from Bernhard. In the first winter the "hardy" C. ichangensis (he tagged it 5*) died and all IVIA seedlings and a few seedlings of another cultivar survived with some damage from winter sun and frost. After three years one or two plants bloomed. I had to repot these plants and some time later planted one of them in ground again and kept another in a container. The latter one bloomed after three or four years. Typival IVIA-fruit. I have a crafted IVIA fom ADAVO aswell. The one from ADAVO had a lot of seeds the fruits of my seedling none.

Zitrusgaertner:

--- Quote from: SoCal2warm on May 10, 2021, 06:05:52 PM ---
--- Quote from: Zitrusgaertner on May 10, 2021, 07:09:58 AM ---I am really bad at posting pictures but believe me, I have a seedling of Ichangensis IVIA in my garden that now is in ground for round ten years. Is is 150cm high and was never protected and was never damaged from cold. Is is deeply green an looks much healthier than my poncirus which does not like the soil. It seems to be much more resistant to limestone than PT.

--- End quote ---
You say you are in Vienna, zone 7b.
Do you think you might be in a part of the city that is actually more like 8a ?
Thank you for sharing the picture and information about your Ichang papeda growing there.

I wonder why my Ichang papedas don't appear to be looking as hardy. Maybe what I have is a different cultivar of Ichang papeda that is not as hardy? Maybe something about the climate here, with its wet winters and lack of heat in the early part of the year?


One additional piece of evidence that points to Yuzu being more likely to be a hybrid is that it is always full of many seeds, and most of those seeds are nucellar, whereas Ichang papeda often seems to have almost no seeds, presumably due to not being pollinated by a different variety, and I think the seeds in Ichang papeda are zygotic.
Typically hybridization (between different species) often results in that sort of situation.

--- End quote ---

My part of Vienna (north of river Danube) is hot and dry. Zone 8a at least. Tmin in the last 5 years -10C The point is sun protection on clear winter days. Ichangensis is in a shady place. Therefore it does better than Citrumelo. All my outdoor-plants had to take -14 six years ago. Ichangensis lost 2/3 of its leaves but no branches as far as I remember. Citrumelo had severe bark-cracks and die-back of 1/3 of its branches. US812 was not very impressed and showed only minor loss of little twigs. Prag was not harmed at all. So C. ichangensis IVIA (F2) is one of my most hardy citrus in open ground. And it is on its own roots. I will test it as rootstock for Yuzu.

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