Tropical Fruit > Tropical Fruit Discussion

Why is Mangifera casturi not a mango?

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fliptop:
Mangifera casturi is typically considered a "relative" of mango, but why isn't it considered a "type" of mango instead?

nattyfroootz:
I would assume because it is a different species:

Mangifera indica, Mango
Mangifera casturi, Casturi

Just as

Artocarpus heterophyllus, Jack fruit
Artocarpus integer, Cempedak

Both closely related fruits but not the same thing. Different genetic differences,  etc.

fliptop:
Yeah, that's what I was thinking.

Pantherophis is the genus of rat snakes here, and different species names indicates different rat snakes, but they're all considered rat snakes . . .

My non-scientific brain was just wondering . . .

fruitlovers:
Some botanists do call kasturi a "wild mango". For example Dr. Campbell and Ledesma do that all the time. Personally i think that's not a good practice. Calling all 32 species of mangifera a "wild mango" leads to a lot of confusion. And besides that there are some species besides indica that are cultivated, like odorata and kasturi, so it's incorrect also to call them wild.

swincher:
One of the reasons scientific names are the more precise way to refer to particular plants is there's no ambiguity about whether you mean a genus or species, whereas common names sometimes refer to particular species, sometimes refer to a whole genus, and sometimes even refer to related genera.

So the answer is it's a mango if you want it to be because that's just a common name and therefore imprecise by nature.

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