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Messages - Galatians522

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 10b - best snacking fruits for kids
« on: February 06, 2023, 07:36:55 PM »
I personally prefer mulberry over blackberries, the trauma of brambles tearing me up is too much lol. although I am starting some mysore blue raspberry seeds from Brian Laufer, just out of curiosity.

There are some good thornless blackberries that have have grown ok here in central FL 9b. Mysore has some of the biggest thorns of any rubus I have seen--more like rose thorns.

2
Found another source for bush long bean in the us. This appears to be a totally different variety (or 3 different varieties to be exact) than the one at Baker Creek.

https://codycovefarm.com/product/bush-long-bean-mix/

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: February 02, 2023, 08:15:49 PM »
I would try this for starters. They got 80% take with California Wax Myrtle from soft wood cuttings taken in April and propagated under mist. Seems like a good place to start with Yangmei.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://ucanr.edu/repository/fileAccessPublic.cfm%3Ffn%3Dca1912p10-174549.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiwz9OZlPj8AhXljLAFHZ-kDg8QFnoECCwQAQ&usg=AOvVaw3qXkgxWdAr5JXQC7K5bt-_

4
Some years ago I was in a local Vietnamese grocery and noticed they had a Pummelo in the small Buddhist Shrine in the shop.
I was in a rush, and also didn't want to be disrespectful about the offering in the shrine, so didn't ask about the Pummelo.
About a week later, I was back in the shop, and asked the Lady owner if they sold Pummelos ?
There was a language barrier, as the word Pummelo is not Vietnamese, and also I thought the word for it was Nam, because one of the Vietnamese types is Nam Roi.
Anyway, it went back and forth for a while, me making fruit sizes with my hand for Lime, Orange, Grapefruit, which made sense to both of us, but crashed at Nam.
The Lady was helpful, and suggested I come back after school when her son was working and he could translate.
I tried the hand gestures and Citrus types again.
Finally it clicked for her, and she said '' Ah, you mean Buoi "
Then it clicked for me too, and I remembered that was the Vietnamese word for Pummelo.
We were both happy with the breakthrough, and the Lady said the Pummelo fruit should be back in on Tuesday or Wednesday.
I still wanted to be sure about when to come back in,
so I asked " When will you get the Buoi in the shop" ?
The Lady quickly replied,
"He comes back after three thirty, after school"

I am still working on my pronunciation of Buoi.
Only last week I was walking in my neighbourhood, and noticed an elderly lady in her garden with six 2 metre pummelo trees along her fence.
We chatted, and I asked about the Buoi trees, to which she quickly corrected my pronunciation to one she was happier with.
She said the trees were Pink types grown from seed.
I had seen them often while driving, but never noticed any fruit yet.

Very nice story, thank you for sharing.

5
Season is more variable the further north in the state you go because we have a longer wind of cold to induce bloom. I have seen mango trees bloom as late as the middle of April here. As a result, a variety that is typically thought of as early season (like Rosigold) can have a second round of bloom much later and may ripen with the late season fruit. Ripening time and "hang time" also play an important roll.

6
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Heritage raspberry zone 9?
« on: February 01, 2023, 09:29:46 PM »
Pete Kanaris grows the mysore raspberry. I think hes in zone 9? Ive been wanting to try those, I know nothing of them. Weve grown tons of blackberries, heirlooms always taste the best. We do have one GMO variety called prime ark freedom from university of Arkansas. Puts off two giant crops a year berries 1-1.5 inches long. Fruits on primo canes, not flurocanes! Flavor is decent but the crop production is out of this world

I have grown Mysore. The size of the fruit is good and the flavor is not bad. However, it does not taste anything like a red or black cap raspberry which is very disappointing. The seeds and thorns are very large.

You intrigued me with the primocane blackberry. Are you sure it is GMO? Several sources that sell it list organic, non-GMO plants.

7
If its warm when they flush it will be leaves. Bloom is very sporadic without cold but I have heard of some varieties that supposedly can do it. I think Choc Anon is one.

8
Yes, if they are kept above 60 very few varieties will bloom.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: January 28, 2023, 10:38:59 AM »
Thanks, I didn't even consider that myrica cerifera would also be separate male and female trees.

Yes, they have seperate male and female trees, too. Actually, in my experience the male trees far outnumber the female trees in the wild. With less than 25% of the trees being female as a rough guess. I wonder if this is related to the males having higher vigor? That might explain why some rootstocks seem to lag behind the Yangmei grafts. It would be interesting to have the rootstock in Simon's picture sexed to see if the was anything to this theory.

10
Tru, for me the annona seeds grow easily, just throw them in a community pot and wait. The citrus seeds take longer for me.

Here's one of my citrus seeds (pomelo) that I just started growing. Since I have a lot of them, I'm going to decapitate 10 seedlings shown in the photo and we can see if any of them survive. My guess is 0% success.

Anyone else want to guess how many or if any will survive after cutting off the leaf section (1/3 from top end)?





I agree with 0%

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: January 27, 2023, 07:49:35 PM »
Simon, I have never seen a Yangmei plant in real life, but I have a female wax myrtle (myrica cerifera) in my back yard. Its flower buds look exactly like what you have in the picture.

Hi Galatians552,

Does this look like the same flower buds on your myrica cerifera?  Unfortunately, I decapitated mine to graft Yangmei on, so won't be able to find out.





No, those look like vegetive buds to me. The female flower buds look almost like a really small, smooth pinecone. I don't have a male tree, so I am not as familiar with those buds.

12
As I understanf it, there are no buds below the cotyledons. I believe that it is possible for a bud to regenerate from callus tissue, however, this takes time and there won't be enough energy in the seedling to support it that long unless it is in tissue culture media.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: January 25, 2023, 10:08:32 PM »
Simon, I have never seen a Yangmei plant in real life, but I have a female wax myrtle (myrica cerifera) in my back yard. Its flower buds look exactly like what you have in the picture.

14
I was thinking of R. Parviflorus (not to be confused with R. Parvifolius of Australia). Its native range is mostly west of the Rocky Mtns. but also includes the Great Lakes region according to the great Google. R. Odoratus is a closely related species that has beautiful pinkish purple flowers. It is native to the eastern US including the Great Lakes Region again and ranges as far south as Alabama and Georgia. I think I have only taster the white flowered species. It is indeed thornless.

R. occidentalis is the black raspberry. It is also very good in my opinion and has a depth of flavor that is missing in a lot of the red raspberries.
Makes sense. I realize the black raspberry common name many people just call thimbleberries here. It does have a nice depth kinda like a tropical flavor in a sense. They have thorns.

I did a lot of research on rubus species when I was younger and even had some hybrids that I was working on for Florida. Unfortunately, my wide crosses did not prove fertile and I ran out of spare time to work on it. Maybe some day I'll have the chance to do it again.

15
Congrats! You just picked close to $50 worth of avocados in January!

16
where do you get the cricket frass?

or do you have crickets in a box?

I owned a cricket farm, Acheta domestica is the genus and species of the grey cricket.
I sold 89,000,000 crickets one year
Anyway I am getting the frass from my old farm.

I knew there had to be a reason for your chosen avatar.

17
I hate to be a downer but chances of its survival (without tissue culture techniques) are very slim. The cotlydons are the plant's energy reserve and are also the location of the buds for vegative growth. As the chlorophyll in the stem fades, the sprout will probably starve to death. I supose it doesn't hurt to see what happens, though.

18
I was thinking of R. Parviflorus (not to be confused with R. Parvifolius of Australia). Its native range is mostly west of the Rocky Mtns. but also includes the Great Lakes region according to the great Google. R. Odoratus is a closely related species that has beautiful pinkish purple flowers. It is native to the eastern US including the Great Lakes Region again and ranges as far south as Alabama and Georgia. I think I have only taster the white flowered species. It is indeed thornless.

R. occidentalis is the black raspberry. It is also very good in my opinion and has a depth of flavor that is missing in a lot of the red raspberries.

19
Thimbleberries. Although they hate heat.

Thimbleberries are good. I don't think I'll be growing them in Florida, but I've had them before. They have a nice raspberry flavor. Aren't they mostly thornless, too?

20
Natal Plum. Fully ripe fruit reminds me of cranberry apple sauce.
Must be better selections out there. The ones I had just made my mouth sticky from latex.

The best ones I have tasted were so ripe that they had started to get wrinkly.

21
Natal Plum. Fully ripe fruit reminds me of cranberry apple sauce.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 10b - best snacking fruits for kids
« on: January 23, 2023, 09:30:03 PM »
Wow, what a great thread! In my experience kids like sugarcane. Its prolific, sweet, and has a long season. They ask for it a lot when they are in my garden. Miracle fruit is also very popular, does well in shade, and is on their eye level. I would plant some even if you have to put them in a raised bed or pot because of alkaline soil. I think its important to include some vegetables, too. Cranberry Leaf Hibiscus (aka False Roselle) has been surprisingly popular with kids (especially when served with miracle fruit) and is a creative way to introduce them to leaf vegetables. Roselle would probably also work and has the advantage of having a "fruit." Sweet "snack peppers" are another good one if she likes tomatoes. Mexican Sour Gherkin makes cute "mini cucumbers" and has very few pest problems. Bok Choy stems make a good substitute for celery in the old "ants on a log" snack and it is fairly easy to grow in Florida. Purple/red mombin is an option for a very productive shade tree that has not been mentioned.

23
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Heritage raspberry zone 9?
« on: January 22, 2023, 09:20:49 PM »
I have grown Heritage raspberry in Florida (zone 9b). They benefit from shade and mulch when it gets hot. They don't live very long (due to disease more than heat I believe) but I could get them to last 2-3 years. I think you will fare better with them since you have dryer weather. Heritage has excellent classic raspberry flavor. There is one that would probably do very well for you called Dorman Red. It has Australian native raspberry in its parentage. The flavor is a little different.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 22, 2023, 12:07:57 PM »
I am not saying that these guys are absolutely wrong, but until they support their claims with a double blind study that is published in a peer reviewed scientific journal, it is just their theory. It is also interesting that most of the proponents of the theory are profiting from it in some way.  ???

I think this will erase all your doubts on the subject.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMmSH-628jI

So, I followed the link expecting a scientific study...You have a great sense of humor! ;D

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 21, 2023, 11:07:06 PM »
Pagnr,

One thing I did see in that research paper was that while there is no support for the brix theory at the moment, there is some evidence that high leaf nitrate levels can increase the level of insect predation.

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