Author Topic: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11  (Read 1905 times)

noochka1

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Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« on: September 27, 2017, 02:28:04 PM »
Hi,

I know that people are growing Kuini in South Florida,and I am wondering if it a tree worth having in my orchard.  What is your experience?  How is the fruit compared to a standard mango?  And how easy / difficult is it to fruit compared to standard mango varieties?  Does it "pug" well?  Is it susceptible to anthracnose / phytopthora?  Is it self-fertile or does it need a companion?

roblack

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2017, 07:57:04 PM »
Curious about those questions as well.

I almost bought a kuini at mangofest this year. One of the workers told me it was good for container culture, then another supposedly more knowledgeable person said it was a fast grower, gets big, and is not good for container culture. Being that space is limited, decided against purchasing. Part of me still regrets not getting it.

Have heard the fruit can be quite good, but think it has a bit of fiber. My guess is it will take some time for better cultivars to be identified/developed.

The trees looked very healthy and were beautiful, and they supposedly grow well in South FL.

Would definitely grow kuini if had more space, just to have something different.

You might be able to get more information from someone at the farm at Fairchild, as they are growing and selling them.

HIfarm

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2017, 11:19:24 PM »
Bear in mind, you are asking about a species, not a clone, so impressions about quality could vary quite a bit.  I suspect that the ones from Fairchild are seedlings so probably best if you can get advice from someone who has fruited trees from their same seed source.  If you think about it, what kind of responses would you get if you asked if asked questions about Mangifera indica, not specific clones?

It has probably been 2 or 3 years since I have had kuini.  The ones I tried did not seem to have objectionable fiber.  They are highly fragrant (some call them durian mango but the smell is nothing like durian, just very strong).  I think the fragrance is supposedly linked a good deal to the skin.  I cut up the ones we had & put them in the frig to minimize the odor.  My wife liked them & did not comment on the odor when eating them but always asked when she opened the frig, "what is that smell"?  The flavor was not exactly the same as mango but, if you had to compare it to something, mango certainly comes to mind.

I believe that kuini is a bit more tropical than mango so it may be more inconsistent there -- better for someone else to comment on that.  I have been trying to train mine to stay compact (~12' height limit) but it is too early to say if that will be successful.  I am skeptical that they would do well as a potted plant.  They are supposed to be very resistant to anthracnose.  I have heard that they are self-fruitful but I don't know for sure.

One thing you will notice with kuini (& also some other Mangifera species) -- new growth is a beautiful blood red color, very showy.

John

noochka1

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2017, 06:32:38 AM »
Curious about those questions as well.

I almost bought a kuini at mangofest this year. One of the workers told me it was good for container culture, then another supposedly more knowledgeable person said it was a fast grower, gets big, and is not good for container culture. Being that space is limited, decided against purchasing. Part of me still regrets not getting it.

Have heard the fruit can be quite good, but think it has a bit of fiber. My guess is it will take some time for better cultivars to be identified/developed.

The trees looked very healthy and were beautiful, and they supposedly grow well in South FL.

Would definitely grow kuini if had more space, just to have something different.

You might be able to get more information from someone at the farm at Fairchild, as they are growing and selling them.

I am growing them from seed.  I have 3 seedlings, but I only have space for 1 - and only if that can be kept small.  If you'd like I'll be happy to send you a seedling.

noochka1

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2017, 06:35:38 AM »
Bear in mind, you are asking about a species, not a clone, so impressions about quality could vary quite a bit.  I suspect that the ones from Fairchild are seedlings so probably best if you can get advice from someone who has fruited trees from their same seed source.  If you think about it, what kind of responses would you get if you asked if asked questions about Mangifera indica, not specific clones?

It has probably been 2 or 3 years since I have had kuini.  The ones I tried did not seem to have objectionable fiber.  They are highly fragrant (some call them durian mango but the smell is nothing like durian, just very strong).  I think the fragrance is supposedly linked a good deal to the skin.  I cut up the ones we had & put them in the frig to minimize the odor.  My wife liked them & did not comment on the odor when eating them but always asked when she opened the frig, "what is that smell"?  The flavor was not exactly the same as mango but, if you had to compare it to something, mango certainly comes to mind.

I believe that kuini is a bit more tropical than mango so it may be more inconsistent there -- better for someone else to comment on that.  I have been trying to train mine to stay compact (~12' height limit) but it is too early to say if that will be successful.  I am skeptical that they would do well as a potted plant.  They are supposed to be very resistant to anthracnose.  I have heard that they are self-fruitful but I don't know for sure.

One thing you will notice with kuini (& also some other Mangifera species) -- new growth is a beautiful blood red color, very showy.

John
Thanks a lot for the information, John.  I have a couple of seedlings and they are indeed a brilliant red when they flush.  Beautiful to look at , but not worth having if they taste like crap.  I may try keeping mine in a pot to see if that helps with size control.  Ideally, I would like to keep it at 8-10 feet.

roblack

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2017, 07:12:47 AM »
That is a super kind offer, thank you.

I lifted this from Fairchild's site:

"The Kuini (Mangifera odorata) has been in South Florida for over 50 years, but there has been only a single accession introduced from an unknown source. The tree is vigorous, forming an open canopy with large, deep green leaves and bright red new growth. The flower panicles are large, bright red and highly ornamental. Fruit average 11 ounces and are from green to a canary yellow at maturity, with a rich, sweet flavor and slightly fibrous flesh. Leaf, bloom and fruit tolerance to anthracnose and powdery mildew is excellent. The fruit have an intense, earthy aroma, and kuini is often referred to as the durian mango. Trees have a nice conical crown making it perfect as an ornamental."

Vernmented

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2017, 10:34:14 AM »
I would personally just graft a branch onto an existing in ground tree and prune accordingly. As far as I know the common Mangifera species here in FL are all graft compatible onto indica. Noris was using a Mangifera casturi interstock with lalijiwa but I have heard of it working without from other collectors.
-Josh

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2017, 10:57:49 AM »
The ones sold by fairchild this year were grafted, likely onto turpentine mango root stock.  I would imagine they were from a decent tree.

noochka1

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Re: Mangifera odorata / Kuini in S. Florida, Zone 10B/11
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 11:34:00 AM »
Does anyone know where Fairchild obtained their grafting material?  My understanding is that the single introduction into Florida was a tree that didn't produce particularly good fruit. 

I'm growing mine from seed, so it's anyone's guess what it will taste like.  The seeds appear to be polyembryonic, so now I have a few more seedlings than I was expecting.

 

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