Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 143111 times)

CA Hockey

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #825 on: October 31, 2022, 12:24:38 AM »
It is OK to buy grafted trees. Yes the seedlings can grow faster but not always. My grafted lemon zest and grafted orange sherbet trees are beasts. Yes some seedlings (mainly monoembryonic seedlings) are as large but not nearly as branched and certainly have not yet brought the same type of joy as the grafted trees.

My strategy has been to plant seeds next to and surrounding the grafted trees. Originally I was going to inarch graft everything but I got lazy. Some grafted trees as mentioned have done very well. Others (juicy Peach) have been laggards. Orange essence, coconut cream, M4, and Phoenix grow very well too.

Pina colada seems to be slow regardless. However mine was already 3 years old from Florida when I bought it. It's about 5 ft tall but maybe 6 feet wide at this point with so much dense branching that it really looks like 2 or 3 dwarf trees. i would caution everyone to acknowledge that there are multiple paths to success. Yes seedlings are tried and true but you can still have success with turpentine (seems to be delayed in socal-I think more due to leggy growth exposing branches to sunburn, rot of these branches during winter, and subsequent decline).

I'm in orange in a valley between 2 hills and get about 400-500 chill hours per year and still get great growth on the mangos.

love_Tropic

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #826 on: November 01, 2022, 06:56:01 PM »
Learning about soil types in SoCal.  Lots of information under " Map Unit Composition" know your area soil Clay, Sand, Ph....
Hope this helps. :)
https://casoilresource.lawr.ucdavis.edu/gmap/

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #827 on: November 01, 2022, 07:33:30 PM »
I purchased my house over 30 years ago and knew from day one my native soil was heavy adobe clay. I feel anybody with average intelligence can determine the soil type fairly quickly by digging a hole.

The question is what are you going to do about it? Subtropical fruit trees prefer sandy-loam soil to maximize root growth in SoCal. Most newbie growers do nothing to amend their soil when planting a new tree if it is heavy or clay. If you are lucky and have good soil and good drainage consider yourself ahead of the game in growing sub-tropicals. All you need to do is plant and water. Downey, Pico Rivera, and Alhambra are all examples of areas with great natural soil.

Mango trees are difficult to grow as it is but when you add clay soil to the equation the task just became more challenging.

In my case, I remove one cubic yard of clay soil when planting each tree and replace it with purchased sandy-loam soil. Hole preparation is key if you have heavy soil. At the minimum amend the clay soil with 30% pumice to provide better drainage and root growth when planting a new tree if the native soil does not have good drainage. Most are not willing to do this as human nature dictates growing trees with the least amount of effort. Little effort equates to little results. 

Johnny

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #828 on: November 01, 2022, 08:26:21 PM »
Some areas in Southern California in particular will have layers of different sediment types throughout a yard. That said many housing developments are on backfill which could be sourced from a construction project miles away with completely different substrate. That said, I agree to an extent regarding sandy loams, as you get good drainage and excellent root development, but there are significant downsides to consider.
Gophers stay active in tunneling in silty or sandy loam soils long into the summer, with no apparent signs of activity above ground. In areas where clay composes higher percentages of the soil, the soil sets up much harder, also causing the stated issues regarding root penetration.
Additionally, the shallow clay soils particularly on very steep sloped hills can retain significant moisture throughout extended drought conditions. These benefits should not be overlooked, in addition, heavier soils allow nutrients to be retained, where looser soils often allow nutrients to be leached.

Becoming familiar with your particular growing environment should be considered as it will guide your decisions when setting up a grove.

love_Tropic

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #829 on: November 17, 2022, 04:54:14 PM »
Hi all,
I have spots on my keitt tree after this rain 🌧️ what’s this…any suggestions?



love_Tropic

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #830 on: November 20, 2022, 06:26:10 PM »
Hi all,
I have spots on my keitt tree after this rain 🌧️ what’s this…any suggestions?

Help please did neem oil spray but not helping much....  Any other "orgonic" suggestions ? can sulfur powder / spray help?   

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #831 on: November 20, 2022, 06:29:52 PM »
Hello, how about just leave it alone and let it grow?  Your plants dont always have to look pristine.  Getting a little cold damage this time of year is not a big deal.  It will grow again in 6 months from now. 
Brad Spaugh

greenerpasteur

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #832 on: December 14, 2022, 09:57:42 PM »


I have 3 medium to large size mango. This one is in a greenhouse that's recently multi-grafted: Maha Channok, Brahm Kai Meu, Lemon Zest, Pim Saen Mun.

It's doing really well in a greenhouse. Flushing again.

This one is in 45 gallon I rescued it recently. It will be a Pickering.






Last one is Maha Channok, Keo Savoy, Cat Hoa Loc, Pickering, Sweet Tart.

 

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