Author Topic: Grafting 101  (Read 728 times)

Dirt Diva

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Grafting 101
« on: October 12, 2020, 01:31:07 PM »
Hello All,

I realize it is time to get back to "school" and learn how to graft.
 I have a roselle hibiscus that is almost ready for post harvest clean up and will be cut up for the compost bin anyway and will be perfect for this purpose. Searching now for the best beginner knife ... any suggestions ?

Thanks for any input.

P J, the Dirt Diva
P J, the DivingTemptress and Dirt Diva

ScottR

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2020, 02:31:16 PM »
Diva, if you put in search quire about grafting knives in form old posts about subject will come up. ;)

spaugh

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2020, 03:09:01 PM »
A plain box cutter or regular grafting knife work fine.  There's the schick injector blade and medium exacto handle too.   For harder wood a regular grafting blade is good.  For softer smaller stuff the injector blades work great. 
Brad Spaugh

Dirt Diva

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2020, 04:06:54 PM »
My search for grafting tools

I found this and am curious to hear your opinions on these kits
The Funtech includes 3 blades PLUS 3 replacement blades AND a grafting knife

I look forward to your feedback

P J, the Dirt Diva
P J, the DivingTemptress and Dirt Diva

bsbullie

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2020, 04:17:38 PM »
Roselle is not the best to practice grafting on.  It is customarily propagated from seeds or cuttings.

Avocado and mango are two of the easier to practice on but as I said in the previous post, bad time of year unless you have a heated greenhouse.
- Rob

Orkine

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2020, 06:53:20 PM »
First get a good knife (does not have to be very expensive for starters), not any of those gimmicks called grafting/pruner kits.  You will find some on Amazon.  I got mine from there https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HPWFU2/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I can keep it clean and sharp easily and it is stable in my hands.

While I use this knife frequently, I also use a tool recommended by a forum member that consists of a Schick Plus Injector Blades on a #2 Excel hobby knife handle.  See links below.  It is a surprisingly good and I use this on a lot of softwood grafts.  It is dangerously sharp so please be careful not to lose a thumb.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FOVLEA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006NAU60/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dirt Diva

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2020, 07:09:09 PM »
Roselle is not the best to practice grafting on.  It is customarily propagated from seeds or cuttings.

Avocado and mango are two of the easier to practice on but as I said in the previous post, bad time of year unless you have a heated greenhouse.
This is all about getting my dexterity with the tools  I had no intention of grafts being viable.
P J, the DivingTemptress and Dirt Diva

Seanny

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2020, 07:22:04 PM »
Iím using this




Use thumb to spin that black wheel to clamp the blade.
Best to use an old blade.
I use a blade a year.

Hard to clean oil off on new blade.
I used alcohol to clean new blade yet it still contaminated the grafts.
High failure with new blade.


bsbullie

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2020, 08:07:30 PM »
Roselle is not the best to practice grafting on.  It is customarily propagated from seeds or cuttings.

Avocado and mango are two of the easier to practice on but as I said in the previous post, bad time of year unless you have a heated greenhouse.
This is all about getting my dexterity with the tools  I had no intention of grafts being viable.

Every plant is not equal.  Why practice on something you dont graft.  The practice makes no sense if just cutting for the sake of cutting.  You wouldnt know if it was cut right or wrong.  Practice on something you do intend to graft so you get used to it.  Of course you still wont know if its right if you are not practicing the actual art of grafting...

- Rob

kh0110

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Re: Grafting 101
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2020, 10:30:00 PM »
I'd listen to Rob's advice. If possible, practice on the graft you really intend to do. It makes no sens to practice on grafting avocado which is somewhat easy when you really intent to graft mango (hard to graft). it is even silly to practice grafting mango when really you intent to graft lychee.
Grafting is not just the cutting. It englobes the understanding of the nature of the rootstock and the scion.

But if you're objective here is to find a cutter, then a utility knife like a box cutter, retractable at desired length, would do just fine. I've tried the most expensive grafting knives endorsed by so called "pros", believe me, they're all snake oil.
Thera

 

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