Author Topic: Avocado grafting  (Read 21485 times)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #150 on: March 06, 2020, 03:48:38 PM »
A few grafts, Simon came by a few weeks ago and we top worked around 10 trees.  And I did half a dozen reed seedlings in pots from last summer. 






Brad Spaugh

ScottR

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #151 on: March 06, 2020, 05:55:02 PM »
Nice Brad, I see on bigger stumped avo you did a veneer graft and what type of graft on top? I like to do whip & tongue even on the bigger truck's some time's if not to big other wise let re- sprout and graft next year ! Keep us posted on take's! 8)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #152 on: March 06, 2020, 07:45:52 PM »
Ive been doing a lot of offset clefts scott.  Seems to work like a charm on peaches so I gave it a shot on avocados.  That one may have been a bark graft though, cant remember for sure.  Its a surprise.  Will update this post in a few weeks once I see how many are going.  But so far its looks promising. 
Brad Spaugh

ScottR

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #153 on: March 07, 2020, 10:23:45 AM »
Cool, offset cleft's are great also !!

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #154 on: May 04, 2020, 02:02:46 AM »
Heres how some of the grafts worked out this year.  Pretty good success rates.  Everything on reed seedlings took.  I did a few others on hass and lamb seeslings and had the worst luck with those.  They seem to not get sap flowing until much later in the year than reed seedlings. 

I started grafting stuff in mid february.  Was way too soon, the weather was very cool this spring and delayed the grafts a long time. 

Heres a few pics of the different grafts and how they worked out.  Most have only started to push this week.  Over 2 months later...

This one was a big root sucker on a holiday tree thats falling over.  Top worked to nabal and will remove the main holiday tree later. 







It looks good after removing the tape 10 weeks later.  But this one will grow fast and likely pop apart if left untied.  So after checking it out, Ive put presco pvc flagging tape back on it to help it for another month or 2. 




Sorry my hands are a mess, they got blisters even through gloves pounding in T posts with a stake driver.  They look bad I promise they get washed very often these days.

Heres a few potted reed seedlings top worked to gem and lamb.  These were in the greenhouse and under a grow lamp while it rained outside all spring.  They did much better and quicker than the in ground seedlings this year.  The GH really got them going faster than outside.  I did 6 potted trees and 15 in ground seedlings. Most reed seedlings from last summer.



Heres a few more of the in ground ones.  Because of the larger size, most had to be bark grafted or offset clefts.  The offset clefts seem to work ok.  I put the scions in slightly crooked to make sure the cambiums cross.  Otherwise its hard to tell how to properly line them up with mismatched bark thicknesses.



Other side view.  These will pop apart easily and so they get rewrapped with flagging tape around the union.  All of them are re wrapped on the in ground stuff.  Potted ones wont grow as fast and pop apart and dont need to be held together longer.  These in ground trees are going to explode when it gets hot very soon and the graft will split without extra help for a while. 



Heres one with 3 grafts.  I thought they were going to fail but it now looks like all are takes.  Will only keep the middle one.






This is one Simon did, looks like a very small bark graft maybe, not sure.  I left the union tape on this one for now.







I used buddy tape on the scions this year.  The tape is really nice and stretchy and stays sticky forever.  But the stuff does not breath at all.  And it never dries up and cracks like parafilm.  Many of these scions were not growing for 6+ weeks because of the weather.  They had stalled and were starting to rot in the tape.  I had to go and remove all the tape so they could breath and then they started growing.  It seemed to be a combo of removing tape and warmer weather.  I have mixed feelings on the buddy tape.  Its best to check on it often and if moisture is accumulating and buds are rotting after a few weeks, use a razor and remove the tape just over the buds.  Or if its been 6 weeks, remove all the tape above the union. 

We'll be doing a lot more trees next year and I havent decided which tape to use.  I really hate having to come mess with the tape multiple times after top working the trees.  Im planting 50-75 more avocado seedling trees in ground this year and not looking forward to top working next year.  Too much effort and care has to be taken to remove and then check and reapply tapes.  Maybe theres an easier way?

These are next years trees starting to sprout. 


Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #155 on: May 04, 2020, 02:06:13 AM »
Heres one of the fujikawa trees grafted in July 2018 when this thread started.  Its now flowering along with all the other hawaiian types.  Ive go about 10 hawaii types, all seem to be doing well so far.  This one had a hummingbird nest with some eggs in it. 




Brad Spaugh

behlgarden

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #156 on: May 04, 2020, 05:51:46 PM »


I used buddy tape on the scions this year.  The tape is really nice and stretchy and stays sticky forever.  But the stuff does not breath at all. 


The tape is very breathable per manufacturer.

shaneatwell

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #157 on: May 04, 2020, 06:14:42 PM »
Nice Brad. that's a lot of avocados you'll have.
Shane

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #158 on: May 04, 2020, 07:37:52 PM »
Very cool Brad, looks like you a good percentage of take's on your graft's well done like the hummer nest too!!
Congrat's on your graft's hope they all make it !! I hate the false start graft's  when they look like there taking then one boom dead( because scion was just living off of stored supply) well any way best of the grafting god's luck to you.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #159 on: May 04, 2020, 09:33:05 PM »


I used buddy tape on the scions this year.  The tape is really nice and stretchy and stays sticky forever.  But the stuff does not breath at all. 


The tape is very breathable per manufacturer.

Im  not sure what they mean by that.  It clearly traps water in there.  Which is fine, all tape is going to do that.  It just does it really well, to the point of needing to be checked on and removed after some time if the buds havent begun pushing. 
Brad Spaugh

barath

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #160 on: May 07, 2020, 01:32:46 PM »
I remember years ago talking with Mark Albert (of Pineapple Guava fame), and he said that he used to run a commercial Avocado nursery in Santa Barbara where he would use a grafting sealer (I think it was Doc Farwell's), which he said is pretty much the same as diluted Elmer's Glue.  I've been meaning to try it out, because I sometimes have the same problem with buddy tape.  Parafilm cracks too easily and buddy tape never breaks apart...

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #161 on: May 07, 2020, 03:42:27 PM »
I was introduced to diluted Elmer's glue years ago by John Moore (when CRFG had around 60 members and a mimeographed newsletter).  Grafted many a tree with the glue protecting the scion.  In our area with night and morning fog (well, used to) the glue would soften and turn whitish allowing buds to push through.  I keep my Parafilm in a cool dark area to keep it stretchy and soft.  That which I leave out tends to break, not stretch.  Much easier to use than diluted Elmers glue.

CA Hockey

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #162 on: May 07, 2020, 03:52:15 PM »
My grafts this year did really well also, but last week's heat wave fried my Kahalu'u blooms (every single one) and some of my new grafts as well.  >:(

I really like buddy tape. Works really well, and I just fold pieces to hold the graft union in place. The wood grows through it within a year and doesn't have any trouble.

Mango Stein

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #163 on: July 22, 2020, 08:22:50 AM »
I did this avocado graft in the Fall and it pushed out some leaves, but I guess I removed the tape too soon. Although it was never as bad as it is now. Is this salvagable? Will it heal long term?


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ScottR

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #164 on: July 22, 2020, 10:52:33 AM »
Wow, looks like only cambium connection on one side a little I don't think it will heal over completely the way it is another idea to save it might be to carefully re-cut section that has callused over and re-wrap whole graft!
Best of luck how ever you precede :o ;)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #165 on: July 22, 2020, 03:27:49 PM »
The grafts are going good here.  Was able to retry and get most of the trees top worked.  Had 4 out of 15 that didn't work and need to be redone next year. 

This one really took off, it was a bark graft.  If I were to do this again, I would ha e made the joint 2X as long.  Now it grew so fast and theres only a small section holding together. 



3 months later

Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #166 on: July 23, 2020, 10:48:24 AM »
Nice Brad, I like it when they blow and go I also had to re-due a few graft's this year but all is good now! ;)

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #167 on: July 25, 2020, 12:12:53 PM »
what time of year is best for grafting avocados? (I'm in North FL)

I tried several in early June and only one took (out of 6 or so).  I'm wondering if it was poor timing. i did cleft and side grafting.

Nyuu

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #168 on: July 25, 2020, 02:29:45 PM »
Question I started grafting mango trees seems like they're going to be growing will but wanted to know if avocados any more difficult than those
« Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 02:32:47 PM by Nyuu »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #169 on: July 26, 2020, 11:00:36 AM »
Wow!  Nice work Brad.   That's some awesome growth.

All my Jan Boyce top working took, 2 on a Sharwil and one on a GEM.   Grasshoppers are epidemic here totally stripping all material.  I tied Clemson fruit bags to protect the new shoots.  These things are awesome.



Avocados and mangos both are easy to graft Nyuu if you know what you're doing, have the right stuff, good timing, decent temps.

kfog

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #170 on: July 28, 2020, 01:17:32 AM »
I'm relatively new to avocado grafting so have a couple of basic questions. I'm growing a few seedlings in pots (for grafting onto in the spring) and one other which I recently attempted a cleft graft on. Should I be feeding them at this stage?

A few months back I tried a bud graft. The bud didn't flush but the scion wood is still green and looks healthy. Is there any chance a new bud will grow from where the original one was?

Stephan

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #171 on: October 12, 2020, 11:29:20 PM »
I have Hass seedlings that I want to use as rootstock. How thick should the stems be before I graft onto them?

 

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