Author Topic: RIP... second loquat tree loss  (Read 3905 times)

funlul

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 440
    • SoCal zone 10a SGV
    • View Profile
RIP... second loquat tree loss
« on: November 14, 2015, 08:15:46 PM »
I suppose we officially lost another loquat tree. Not sure how the first one died, but the second tree (4' tall, growing new leaves and with 2 graft takes) basically turned yellow-brown in less than 3 weeks. A trunk scratch test shows dead brown near the root, while top of the tree still has some green. I guess it died from the root and probably beyond redemption. Could it be a case of fire blight?

Loquats are said to be easy growers and we somehow lost two in a row already :'( while the allegedly more fragile lychee / longan are doing OK, knock on wood... Could it be some poor gardening practice? Tears. As an afterthought, I just saw from my 10/23 photo the trunk had cracked bark near the root. I wonder what was it?

Taken 10/23/15



Taken 11/14/15

Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6467
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2015, 01:29:12 AM »
The bark on your tree looks horrible, even in the first picture when the leaves were still green. There even appears to be a vertical crack that goes down into the soil. All those cracks in the bark allow insects and disease an easy entry for attack. It can be a number of things that killed this tree.

In the first picture you posted, when leaves were still green, you can already see there were issues as the leaves were curled, under sized and misshaped.

Good news is that Loquats are generally very easy to grow. Where did you get this tree from? I recommend buying a grafted tree or you can plant seeds and graft it yourself. I believe your tree fell victim to disease because of the poor condition of the bark. Your tree looks like it was pretty much girdled. I'm not sure what the tree looked like when you got it or how you took care of it but these trees are normally very resilient.

Simon

socal10b

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
    • El Monte, CA
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2015, 01:42:11 AM »
Did u use any chemical fertilizers lately? Ur tree looks like my dead loquat tree. I made a mistake on my first big Jim loquat tree by pouring too much fox farm grow big around the base.

greenman62

  • CharlesitaveNB
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1277
    • [url=https://vgruk.com/]vgr uk[/url]
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2015, 12:13:16 PM »
the bark does look bad
but i see something else.
the soil around the base in the last photo looks like coffee grounds maybe ?
if it is, grounds can create a "shell" on top the soil that water can not penetrate.

whatever it is, it doesnt look mixed in with the rest of the soil.
this can lead to a ball of soil being wet, while the rest of the soil is dry
or, vice/versa
constant moisture can lead to fungal problems.
obviously not enough water is a problem also.

funlul

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 440
    • SoCal zone 10a SGV
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2015, 01:16:05 PM »
Thank you all, it was a grafted tree from Mimosa Nursery, planted somewhere this spring. I attempted multi-grafting a little later and removed the failed grafts. Maybe that was stressful, but it seemed to be happy and leafing out until I first noticed the symptoms last month(coming from below). I don't know when the bark issues happened, have to look into old photos for possible hints.

No fertilizing, but we collect water from the kitchen for the trees (from rinsing fruits, vegetables etc) and bury organic wastes (no meats) several away from the tree, you can see some egg shell pieces even. Maybe that attracted rodents...

Does loquat tree need significantly more water than fruit trees of similar size? Young jujube, persimmon, peach, fig, cherimoya trees are all planted in the same row.

Could it be fire blight? I am particularly concerned if I must remove the tree completely. Otherwise I might keep in until spring just in case...

Again, THANK YOU so much!!
Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6467
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2015, 01:54:42 PM »
We're your trees dripping water or sap from cankers, cracks in branches, twigs or trunk? If so it could be fire blight but it would only be a guess unless you submit samples for positive identification. http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7414.html

If I were you, I would remove the tree and roots. Even if it did come back

Simon

Doglips

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 980
    • Houston TX 9A
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2015, 04:02:08 AM »
I've never seen fireblight on Loquats.  On pears at least, it really does look like the branch was in a fire, heavily scorched and blistered.  It does look a little like fireblight at the base of the of the tree.  If it entered from the soil maybe it barely got started on the trunk before it killed it.  I think that if it is in the soil you shouldn't try again for 5 years.   Of course you can plant something else.  You can grow one in a pot, one of mine is fruiting nicely in a pot, the other hasn't yet, but it was grown from seed so it may be a bit young yet.  You could take a sample to your local county AG extension and see what they say.  When and how you fertilize can really make a difference in fireblight control, at least on pears and apples. Nasty stuff.

Jack, Nipomo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 501
  • San Luis Obispo County, CA zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2015, 09:28:12 AM »
I have lost 3 loquats to fireblight over the past 15 years..  All were mature trees and started with the rapid die off of just one limb.  Pruned that off and subsequently others were affected.  These were healthy trees, not fertilized and on limited water to lessen susceptible growth.  We have night and morning fog, disease is not coming from the ground as lower parts of trees were sound and resprouted.  My apples have never been hit, but some pears are.  According to research, even bees can carry the disease from infected plants as they pollinate.  Nasty disease.  However, loquat wood burns well in the fireplace.

venturabananas

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 215
    • USA, CA, Ventura, zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2015, 10:53:00 AM »
Does loquat tree need significantly more water than fruit trees of similar size? Young jujube, persimmon, peach, fig, cherimoya trees are all planted in the same row.

No, not in my experience.  I'd say less than those, if anything.

BrianL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 202
    • Bay Area, California
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2015, 12:31:48 PM »
I've never seen fireblight move from bottom to top.  I had loquats be totally unaffected while nearby trees caught some, then one year by Big Jim just got completely wiped out relatively quickly.  Guess I wasn't aggressive enough dealing with it.  Odd thing is I had a grafted seedling Oliver and Argelino (spelling?) in pots ten feet away as well as seedling with no infection.

Doglips

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 980
    • Houston TX 9A
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2015, 01:40:40 AM »
Fireblight likes cool damp weather, that is when it becomes active.  At least on pears and apples, the fireblight enters on growing branch points where the cambium is exposed (bees can carry it too).  You can try a Bordeaux mixture, but they have to be applied at the right time, cool and wet, usually after the rain or it gets washed off.  Bordeaux mixture won't help with bee transmission.  Limit fertilizing during cool weather, you don't want growth while cool and damp.  There is an antibiotic that can kill it, name eludes me at the moment, and I think it has to be injected.

gnappi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1854
    • South East Florida (U.S.A) Zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2015, 10:06:13 AM »
Jeez, I have three loquats two in pots (supreme from Charlie) and a Christmas in the ground. These are about the only fruit trees I have that I sometimes forget about their being there and they thrive! Maybe you have a mad neighbor spraying weed killer on them :-)
Regards,

   Gary

funlul

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 440
    • SoCal zone 10a SGV
    • View Profile
Re: RIP... second loquat tree loss
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2015, 01:59:44 AM »
Thank you all!  I really do not know what to say. 
Baby loquats in pots are doing perfectly OK. Apple tree in 15 gal pot blooming and seemingly happy.

Oh we do have some grubs in the ground. Not sure if they are the root-eating kind.
If they are, can a tree be killed that fast?


We're your trees dripping water or sap from cankers, cracks in branches, twigs or trunk?...
If I were you, I would remove the tree and roots. Even if it did come back.

Dripping water would def. caught attention.  It just looked like the tree dried out quickly... :'(

Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk