Author Topic: My mango experience with three Condo cultivars . . . .  (Read 778 times)

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
My mango experience with three Condo cultivars . . . .
« on: March 26, 2021, 03:00:59 AM »
My three mango cultivars, all in 7 gallon pots had no problems wth the cold here in Tampa this winter.  They each made flower spikes in early March, but . . .

The 'Irwin' made one infloresence that got knocked off accidentally and it did not bother to throw out another one.

The 'Beverly', the tallest one of the three at 6 to 7 feet, threw a terminal inflorescence and one lateral and bloomed profusely but set no fruit.

The 'Ice Cream' made about six modest sized inflorescences and set about ten fruit between them.  They are small, only the size of English peas at the tme if this writing and look okay but I don't know if they will all hold. This is my first experience with trying to grow mangoes here in Tampa so I am keeping my fingers crossed that 'Ice Cream' will hold these few fruit.

I don't expect any fruit on the other two cultivars since the flowers are all finsihed and have dropped.

So far my mango trees' leaves are blemish free and the plants appear happy. But since this is my first foray into growing mangoes I would welcome any cultural advice y'all might could offer to a rank mango newbie.

Cheers!

Paul M.
=
« Last Edit: April 11, 2021, 01:22:05 AM by Epicatt2 »

Gambit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 54
    • USA, Florida, St. Pete, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2021, 04:33:18 AM »
Paul,
I'm across the bay in St. Pete. The 7-gal trees should be in the ground, except the Irwin. Well, the Irwin too, since you can always top-work. I've got a few trees in my yard (most were 7-gals when planted), and they all handle the cold spells pretty well each season. 3-gal trees, on the other hand, will succumb to the occasional frost (eg. Jan 2018) that hits our area unless they're protected. Majority of my tree are holding fruitlets now, and I'm fairly optimistic that we'll have a good season. So far, my only disappointment this year is the Phoenix, which started blooming profusely late Jan and subsequently dropped all blooms, with absolutely no takes for one reason or another...

Early February.


Same tree in March.

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2021, 05:10:27 AM »
Thanks for the reply, Gambit.  I'm in 9b so have not put these three trees into the ground yet because I don't trust enough that we wouldn't have a frost eventually in Tampa, so in pots they can be moved to a protected area if need be.

This is their first attempt a flowering and I wan't expecting a loaded crop at this early stage.  That the 'Ice Cream' has set ten fruit is promising to me and I hope that a few will make it to maturity this first time.

I've held off watering these trees and only given them an occasional splash apart from any rains that we've had in the past two months.  I've also held off on fertilizing them with the exception of havng given them each just 1 tablespoon of granular 10-10-10 fertilizer once the cold had passed.

I'm hoping that the treatment I have given them will keep them happy and growing.

Still would like any other suggestions for caring for these mangoes 'til I'm ready to put them into the ground.  I have well-drained sandy soil so my fruit trees need watering occasionally up 'til when the rainy seaason arrives.

TIA

Paul M.
==

Gambit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 54
    • USA, Florida, St. Pete, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2021, 05:57:50 AM »
Yeah, inland Tampa always seems to get a few degrees colder than south St. Pete. I feed my small potted Taymour with "Osmocote 6-month smart release" fertilizer. I would highly recommend Osmocote for potted plants as there's very little chance of problems from overfeeding. Watering-wise, you would have to stay on top cos in-pots will dry out much faster than in-ground. I usually scratched the to top 1-2 inches of the soil, and if the soil is dry, water. Generally a 7-gal pot in full sun will require 3x weekly waterings. I have the same soil conditions, beach sand with absolutely no organic matter.
Good luck with your mangos. Hope you have some to harvest this season !!

Gim

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9235
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2021, 07:43:23 AM »
You shouldn't be letting any 7 gal mango tree hold fruit.  Period.
- Rob

850FL

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
    • zone 8b/9a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2021, 07:49:42 AM »
I rarely get any damage on mangos during a light frost, but below 25 has decimated many seedlings and saplings..

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2021, 01:27:49 PM »
You shouldn't be letting any 7 gal mango tree hold fruit.  Period.

What??  Even if they are dwarf or semi-dwarf cultivars?

My whole idea was to have several smallish mango trees for my yard –and maintain them in pots.  It seems that others do this same thing with their dwarf/condo mangoes and often that's
on a narrrow littlle balcony some floors up in their condo building!

Paul M.
==
« Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 01:36:51 PM by Epicatt2 »

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1043
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2021, 01:39:12 PM »
You shouldn't be letting any 7 gal mango tree hold fruit.  Period.

What??  Even if they are dwarf or semi-dwarf cultivars?

My whole idea was to have several smallish mango trees for my yard –and maintain them in pots.  It seems that others do this same thing with their dwarf/condo mangoes.....

Paul M.
==
Earlier when I read this I thought it would be nice to be able to put that in the container Greenhouse section if we had one.  I had the feeling that you are growing yours permanently in containers. Potentially you may put one or two dwarfs in the ground but for the most part you are a container grower. Hopefully one of the container grow house forum members can give you advice on the possibilities of growing a mango in a container :)
Everything is  not a commercial enterprise some folks are happy with a dozen or more.
As Truly Tropical Chris often says to each their own.
 As Epicatt2  says cheers :)
« Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 03:19:53 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Little Gem Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS Phoenix Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam Lychee Guava  Atemoya Sugar Apple Soursop Citrus Plantain Barbados Cherry

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2021, 03:01:40 PM »
[snip] I had the feeling that you are growing yours permanently in containers. Potentially you may put one or two dwarfs in the ground but for the most part you are a container grower. [snip]

Moi?  Mais non!  Ça n'est pas vrai...

I'm not a container grower for fruit trees necessarily.  (Except for my orchids, of course, yes...)

What I intend to keep in containers are those things that are moderately susceptible to the amount of cold temperatures that we can expect to get here in Tampa (9b) from time to time so that those more tender things are able to be moved inside for protection.

To be more clear, I am collecting things which can take down to 25ºF. or lower (Casimiroa edulis, some Eugenias, and some Garcinias, Mexican avocadoes, and so forth).  Those will be going into the ground when they get large enough.  (I've only been actively adding to my fruit forest for about three years now and started off then with mostly seedlings in 2-inch pots.)

OK — Hope that clarifies things a bit.

Paul M.
==

Gulfgardener

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 13
    • Panhandle 9a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2021, 03:22:07 PM »
Fruiting them in pots is possible. I think the concern is with the size. If it's still in a 7 gal it could still be too young to fruit without doing harm. Orlando Gardener on youtube has many fruiting in pots but his are in 15-25 gal pots with a good size trunk.

I think there are some container growers in CA because of the soil issues so maybe they can chime in. I'm in 9a so I have to grow mine in a pot too. I'd love to at least start a big container thread so we can discuss and not clutter the forum for those living the dream with mangos in ground.

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1043
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2021, 03:37:02 PM »
You shouldn't be letting any 7 gal mango tree hold fruit.  Period.

What??  Even if they are dwarf or semi-dwarf cultivars?

My whole idea was to have several smallish mango trees for my yard –and maintain them in pots.  It seems that others do this same thing with their dwarf/condo mangoes and often that's
on a narrrow littlle balcony some floors up in their condo building!

Paul M.
==
If you have 7 gallon mangoes in pots and intend on keeping them in pots and not planting them in the ground. That qualifies as being a container grower. If you intend on putting them in the ground at some point the sooner the better. They have to develop a root system and letting them carry fruit while in the pot is counterproductive. It could cause them to be runts. If you're going to keep them in pots permanently. Let them carry fruit Que Sera Sera  :)

I have one soursop in container and many trees in the ground. I qualify as being a container grower
« Last Edit: March 26, 2021, 03:44:25 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Little Gem Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS Phoenix Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam Lychee Guava  Atemoya Sugar Apple Soursop Citrus Plantain Barbados Cherry

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9235
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2021, 04:08:36 PM »
You shouldn't be letting any 7 gal mango tree hold fruit.  Period.

What??  Even if they are dwarf or semi-dwarf cultivars?

My whole idea was to have several smallish mango trees for my yard –and maintain them in pots.  It seems that others do this same thing with their dwarf/condo mangoes and often that's
on a narrrow littlle balcony some floors up in their condo building!

Paul M.
==

The trees are too small/young.  Even if it holds a fruit to maturity,  it will be of subpar quality and potentially damage the tree for future development.

Trees should be let to produce based on age and maturity,  not because its a supposed "dearf" and in a smallish pot.
- Rob

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2021, 12:06:06 AM »
UPDATE: 

My ʻIce Creamʻ in the 7 gal. pot that bloomed and set ten tiny fruit on four inflorescences has now dropped all but two, which are on one inflorescence.

Iʻm curious to see whether they hold.

Paul M.
==

FMfruitforest

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 282
  • Tropical Fruit
    • USA, FL, Fort Myers, Iona MicroClimate, 4 miles from coast zone 10a
    • View Profile
    • Accent Masonry
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2021, 04:51:15 AM »
Last year


This year


It’s nice to have a slow growing tree that still produces fruit.  If the trunk is sturdy enough id let it hold fruit.

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2021, 02:58:06 AM »
UPDATE 2:

My 'Ice Cream' in the 7 gal. pot has now shed two of the original 10 fruit that it set.

Fingers X-ed that it will manage to hold onto these remaining fruit.

Stay tuned, Rob!

Paul M.
==
« Last Edit: April 08, 2021, 11:01:51 AM by Epicatt2 »

Jagmanjoe

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
    • USA, Florida, Lakeland, 9A
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2021, 04:32:18 AM »
Paul, don't let others dissuade you from your endeavor with potted mango trees.  If you go to FB there is a group called potted mango growing with plenty of success stories here in Florida and around the country and world.  I personally am starting to graft some smaller ones in pots and, while many might disagree, I am not worried about the tree growth as much as getting some production of fruits. I am too old and don't know how many seasons of mango enjoyment I have left so I am working at getting fruit as quickly as possible.  Accordingly, even smaller ones that I have in the ground that may have lost their original panicles are getting a dose of K along with a couple of other things to encourage them to flower again.  Actually a couple are again throwing out small panicles.  When they produce fruit that may be difficult for the tree to support, I will fashion something that will help the tree support that fruit.

To me, going against the odds and thinking outside the box has often times produced results that others simply said was impossible.  Follow your heart and dreams and make the impossible possible!

Best of luck to you.



Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2021, 02:16:13 PM »
Thanks for the encouragement, Jagmanjoe!

I don't want these three trees to get real large anyway, so if keeping them in a pot & pruning them will keep them from getting rangy but they'll still make me some fruit, well, I'm all for that.

If I get two to three dozen good & tasty mangos off these three trees per year I'll be satisfied.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1043
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three cultivars . . . .
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2021, 04:54:14 PM »
Thanks for the encouragement, Jagmanjoe!

I don't want these three trees to get real large anyway, so if keeping them in a pot & pruning them will keep them from getting rangy but they'll still make me some fruit, well, I'm all for that.

If I get two to three dozen good & tasty mangos off these three trees per year I'll be satisfied.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==
I want in on this potted mango endeavor it sounds like you are receiving joy and fun out of this. :)
I ordered for my daughter who lives in Tallahassee. A Saigon which is a true dwarf and a
Lemon Zest grafted onto Piva rootstock. This would give us a shared hobby other than Jeeps to have conversations about. I shared the link to FB potted mango Growers with her. Her favorite mango is Sweet Tart so I am hoping Saigon being indo-chinese may have a little tart to it. Please keep us updated and posted on your three mango cultivar endeavor. I for one am interested :)
« Last Edit: April 09, 2021, 05:11:14 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Little Gem Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS Phoenix Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam Lychee Guava  Atemoya Sugar Apple Soursop Citrus Plantain Barbados Cherry

Epicatt2

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three Condo cultivars . . . .
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2021, 02:44:44 AM »
Will do, Bovine.

Another UPDATE:

We had a storm tonight here when a cold front pushed through with a lot of squally wind and rain.  It will be interesting to see tom'w whether all the fruitlets are still on the 'Ice Cream'.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
==

850FL

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
    • zone 8b/9a
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three Condo cultivars . . . .
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2021, 02:44:38 PM »
Will do, Bovine.

Another UPDATE:

We had a storm tonight here when a cold front pushed through with a lot of squally wind and rain.  It will be interesting to see tom'w whether all the fruitlets are still on the 'Ice Cream'.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
==

Did y'all get hail from that storm too? I thought lightning was going to zap me it was intense

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1043
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My mango experience with three Condo cultivars . . . .
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2021, 06:13:19 PM »
I am technically a potted mango grower now. Just received email from Alex my order is ready. I purchased two of these one to go in the ground and one to stay in the pot.
Saigon is a name that was applied to a shipment of seeds sent to Florida from then-French Indochina by David Fairchild in 1902.

 

The ‘Saigon’ we have was obtained from Fairchild Farm, from a tree grafted off of what was considered David Fairchild’s “original” Saigon.

 

This tree makes medium-to-large oblong shaped fruit that turn a light greenish-yellow color at maturity.

 

The flesh is yellow, fiberless, with an Indochinese-hybrid class flavor.

Other versions of Saigon grown from seed have seen some degree of variation, with some developing pink or red blush and smaller fruit of varying shape. Because it is polyembryonic, many Saigon trees in the early 20th century were grown from seed.

 

Fairchild’s original Saigon is quite dwarfish in growth habit and very precocious, and fruits well in Homestead, FL.

 

We planted a small grafted tree in 2017 for evaluation and look forward to trialing it here. Thus far it has grown *very* slowly and may not be ready to fruit until the 2021 season. It does appear to be a true dwarf.

 

Flavor: Indochinese hybrid

Country: Vietnam
Tete Nene Julie Little Gem Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS Phoenix Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam Lychee Guava  Atemoya Sugar Apple Soursop Citrus Plantain Barbados Cherry