Author Topic: Duke Avocadoís  (Read 201 times)

SubTropic805

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Duke Avocadoís
« on: June 28, 2024, 01:13:32 AM »
After scouring the internet for grafted Duke trees, posting Wtb ads on here both to no avail. I was invited to a friends wedding in Coloma, Ca. Immediately I knew I had a 2 hour detour to the old train station in Oroville, Ca where there are two massive 80+ year old specimen Duke avocado trees holding on without any care other than what nature provides them.

I was concerned that I wouldn't find good scion material, as it was mid June. Fortunately I found more than I needed on the lower branches. As I was admiring these large trees with a cool story I noticed a small fig tree growing out of the crotch of a large limb 8-10ft up. As I starred further and realized there was an avocado seedling growing as well. I immediately climbed the tree and found there was the fig and three Duke seedling growing in thick leaf litter that had collected. I pulled out the largest of the three immediately topping and removing the leaves then wrapped the bare roots in a moist paper towel and into a ziploc, as well as the scions.in the cooler they went until we made it back to the central coast three days later.

I had my fingers crossed that the seedling would pull through, and I picked up a Reed avocado at the big box store as a donor plant for the scion.

Itís been two weeks since I grafted the plants and things are looking good, buds are swelling and Iíd imagine they pop through the tape this week. The seedling was potted up, and I added a make shift humidity dome made of a cut water bottle. The seedling has shot out young leaves and looks to be a successful transplant.

It was a fun little adventure up north, and if my grafts are successful I plan to make Duke scion more available to people on here that are interested in growing them. Iím also curious to play my hand in the Frolich method and try to root some pure Dukes.

Iíll post updates as things progress.












« Last Edit: June 28, 2024, 10:50:05 AM by SubTropic805 »

drymifolia

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Re: Duke Avocadoís
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2024, 10:59:46 AM »
Did you happen to notice whether the trees had flowered and set any fruit this year? I know it can be a shy producer.

It's funny you mention this here, I recently posted an offer for scionwood on the GF forum, as I just finished heavily pruning my Duke grafts in my greenhouse. I'm having trouble with fruit set on Duke, some other much smaller grafts set more fruit, so I decided to cut back the more vigorous Duke to give the others a chance to catch up.


SubTropic805

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Re: Duke Avocadoís
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2024, 11:14:00 AM »
Did you happen to notice whether the trees had flowered and set any fruit this year? I know it can be a shy producer.

It's funny you mention this here, I recently posted an offer for scionwood on the GF forum, as I just finished heavily pruning my Duke grafts in my greenhouse. I'm having trouble with fruit set on Duke, some other much smaller grafts set more fruit, so I decided to cut back the more vigorous Duke to give the others a chance to catch up.

I wish I woulda found your post sooner! 😂

I didnít notice any fruit set while I was there. The trees are huge though so they could have been hiding young fruit higher in the canopy. I also didnít notice any signs of flowering but it could have set and all the non pollinated flowers could have dried and dropped off by the time I was up there. There was definitely some fruit last year though, the seedlings were very young.

Hopefully cutting yours back gets them to set heavier. Do you have any other varieties to help with pollination in your greenhouse?

Elijah

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Re: Duke Avocadoís
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2024, 12:11:57 PM »
After scouring the internet for grafted Duke trees, posting Wtb ads on here both to no avail. I was invited to a friends wedding in Coloma, Ca. Immediately I knew I had a 2 hour detour to the old train station in Oroville, Ca where there are two massive 80+ year old specimen Duke avocado trees holding on without any care other than what nature provides them.

I was concerned that I wouldn't find good scion material, as it was mid June. Fortunately I found more than I needed on the lower branches. As I was admiring these large trees with a cool story I noticed a small fig tree growing out of the crotch of a large limb 8-10ft up. As I starred further and realized there was an avocado seedling growing as well. I immediately climbed the tree and found there was the fig and three Duke seedling growing in thick leaf litter that had collected. I pulled out the largest of the three immediately topping and removing the leaves then wrapped the bare roots in a moist paper towel and into a ziploc, as well as the scions.in the cooler they went until we made it back to the central coast three days later.

I had my fingers crossed that the seedling would pull through, and I picked up a Reed avocado at the big box store as a donor plant for the scion.

Itís been two weeks since I grafted the plants and things are looking good, buds are swelling and Iíd imagine they pop through the tape this week. The seedling was potted up, and I added a make shift humidity dome made of a cut water bottle. The seedling has shot out young leaves and looks to be a successful transplant.

It was a fun little adventure up north, and if my grafts are successful I plan to make Duke scion more available to people on here that are interested in growing them. Iím also curious to play my hand in the Frolich method and try to root some pure Dukes.

Iíll post updates as things progress.













The tree looks majestic,  its gigantic trunk speaks all. Climbing the tree tells us your enthusiasm for growing avocado tree. It is obvious that avocado lovers will go to great lengths for their passion! ;) ;D


drymifolia

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Re: Duke Avocado’s
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2024, 01:01:13 PM »
Hopefully cutting yours back gets them to set heavier. Do you have any other varieties to help with pollination in your greenhouse?

I think it's a temperature issue, Duke seems especially prone to not setting fruit when the overnight temperatures are below 50įF during flowering, and that's almost always the case in my greenhouse. It flowered profusely (maybe 10,000 individual flowers) and set only about half a dozen fruit, then aborted all but one of those a few weeks later. The sole remaining fruit has not developed much and I expect it to be aborted soon too.

I have many other grafts on in-ground greenhouse trees, including some things I've collected from others on this forum that aren't known cultivars. Of those, the ones that seem to set the most fruit despite low temperatures are Walter Hole (from UC germplasm orchard), Linh (a new introduction from a forum member), and Brissago (via a forum member, ortet was discovered growing in Switzerland).

Most of my grafts are just 1 to 3 years old, so I'm hoping next year will have better fruit set, but there are still a handful that haven't aborted so maybe I'll get my first fruit this year. Here's the only remaining Brissago fruit, photo from a couple days ago:




Brissago was the only one year-old graft to set fruit.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2024, 01:10:40 PM by drymifolia »

 

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